Château de Herrebouc

Saint-Jean-Poutge, France

The Château de Herrebouc is a castle in the commune of Saint-Jean-Poutge. Though an older building, the present look of the castle is the result of a major campaign of construction work at the start of the 17th century. On the ground floor, the 17th century ceiling is partially conserved. The farm buildings date from this period. The pigeon loft is characteristic of the architecture of the time of Henri IV (reigned 1589 to 1610). The wine cellar is probably a later structure.

The mill retains an intact medieval base. Medieval walls are also visible in the buildings of the farm.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monique Gobbo (9 months ago)
Très beau domaine. Au top.
Christelle Arçanuthurry (2 years ago)
Magnifique domaine Aussi beau que bon
darknight56 who (2 years ago)
Excellente visite ! Très bon accueil Je recommande ! Excellent vin
Georges BEAUVAIS (2 years ago)
Très joli site, avec vins de qualité. Le partage d'expérience est apprécié ... Une belle visite à une bonne adresse !
Cécile B (3 years ago)
Magique. À ne louper sous aucun prétexte. Visite familiale du mercredi avec dégustation de vins mais aussi découverte des senteurs à l'aveugle. Le sens de l'accueil et des vins à découvrir. La passion des vigneronnes aussi ajoute du plaisir. Un partage à faire absolument.
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