La Romieu Church

La Romieu, France

Arnaud d'Aux was born in the little village of La Romieu in Gascony in 1265 and later became cardinal in 1312. To honour his birth he ordered the construction of this Collegiale de La Romieu. As a result an abbey with a church, two towers and a court were constructed in gothic style were completed in 1318. One of the towers is an octoganal completely closed structure. The other tower is a much more square-shaped open structure carrying the chruch bells. In the church which is beautifully restored, there are unique frescos with esoteric motives and black angels on display for the public. The tiled floor is still in its original state.

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Details

Founded: 1318
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fr Simon Lumby (2 years ago)
Just beautiful!
Brice Mallet (2 years ago)
Edifice gothique remarquable et peintures décoratives de la sacristie à tomber par terre
nicolas audouin (2 years ago)
Agréable bon film mais tour déserte
Gilles Cherance (2 years ago)
Ensemble grandiose. Très belle architecture. Beau cloître
Martyn Hempsted (3 years ago)
Built in the early 14th century, this collegiate church is well worth a visit, however, be prepared for a hard climb up and down the steep spiral stairs to make this trip worthwhile.
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