Pitareti Monastery

Tandzia, Georgia

The Pitareti monastery consists of the Theotokos church, a belfry, the ruined wall and several smaller accessory buildings. The main church appears to have been built in the reign of George IV early in the 13th century. Its design conforms to the contemporary canon of a Georgian domed church and shares a series of common features – such as a typical cross-in-square plan and a single lateral porch – with the monasteries of Betania, Kvatakhevi, and Timotesubani. The façades are decorated, accentuating the niches and dormers. The entire interior was once frescoed, but only significantly damaged fragments of those murals survive.

The monastery was a property and a burial ground of the noble family of Kachibadze-Baratashvili and, since 1536, of their offshoots – the princes Orbelishvili. A 14th-century inscription mentions a ctitor – the royal chamberlain Kavtar Kachibadze. Another inscription, from a grave stone, records the name of Qaplan Orbelishvili who refurnished the monastery in 1671. The monastery thrived at Pitareti until 1752 when it was forced to close due to a marauding attack from Dagestan.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Konstantin Gotua (25 days ago)
Great place you must see it
george nadirashvili (2 months ago)
Great, beautiful place. Pitareti is medieval church built in 13th century by King George IV. Legend tells that constructing the church has begun while reign of Tamar the Great. Builders from Italy were working on architecture of complex with georgians. Here you can see georgian wall iconography from 14th and 16th century. The monastery was very rich and prosper. In it's golden age It was controlling 3-5 villages plus Khuluti Fortress (3.5 kilometres from monastery). Over times it was pillaged by a few conquerors. Last people who pillaged Pitareti were Daghestnians. Nowdays the main church is on a pretty well condintions also the wall still stand proudly. You can also check ruins of cellar. I totally reccomend visiting Pitareti. Not only the place is great but also monks there are very friendly and great hosts. You will surely be hosted with there own honey and tea.
Malcolm MX Taylor (4 months ago)
Extreme drive for an hour through mountains and forest to get there to find a much better road coming from the other way hahahaa. Was great fun tho!!
Tamuna Kvaratskhelia (5 months ago)
Another must-see place in Georgia. The road is not the best, bit it's worth the trip!
Tornike Mghebrishvili (18 months ago)
it's really amazing place, you should see ! Now you can go by any kind of car, (09.06.2020) Rehabilitation is in progress ?✌️
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