Jvari Monastery

Mtskheta, Georgia

Jvari is a sixth century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta. Along with other historic structures of Mtskheta, it is listed as a World Heritage site by UNESCO. It stands on the rocky mountaintop at the confluence of the Mtkvari and Aragvi rivers, overlooking the town of Mtskheta.

According to traditional accounts, on this location in the early 4th century Saint Nino, a female evangelist credited with converting King Mirian III of Iberia to Christianity, erected a large wooden cross on the site of a pagan temple. A small church was erected over the remnants of the wooden cross in circa 545 AD. The present building is generally believed to have been built between 590 and 605 by Erismtavari Stepanoz I. 

The importance of Jvari complex increased over time and attracted many pilgrims. In the late Middle Ages, the complex was fortified by a stone wall and gate, remnants of which still survive. During the Soviet period, the church was preserved as a national monument, but access was rendered difficult by tight security at a nearby military base. After the independence of Georgia, the building was restored to active religious use.

The Jvari church is an early example of a four-apsed church with four niches. Between the four apses are three-quarter cylindrical niches which are open to the central space, and the transition from the square central bay to the base of the dome's drum is effected through three rows of squinches.The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.

Varied bas-relief sculptures with Hellenistic and Sasanian influences decorate its external façades, some of which are accompanied by explanatory inscriptions in Georgian Asomtavruli script. The entrance tympanumon the southern façade is adorned with a relief of the Glorification of the Cross, the same façade also shows an Ascension of Christ.

Erosion is playing its part to deteriorate the monastery, with its stone blocks being degraded by wind and acidic rain.

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Details

Founded: 590-605 AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mohammed sharik (8 months ago)
The sunrise and the sunset from this place gives some other feels and it has a quite feeling to the atmosphere, if you go alone or with Friends you can have a good time anyhow. It makes you feel calm and composed and as well a beautiful view never hurt anyone.
Edgar Ustian (12 months ago)
The monastery is located atop a large hill which opens to a beautiful view of 2 rivers flowing into each other. The sight of the mountain on one side and a city on the other really completes the whole sight. The monastery itself is quite simple and that's the beauty in it. With the giant cross in the middle it fills the whole place with a feeling of holiness.
Jonathan Hol (13 months ago)
Beautiful! The view, inside the church and the surrounding history was a very nice experience. Our guide was making sure we got the history and understanding of the surroundings. Thank you for this experience Georgia!
Giorgi Tsutskiridze (16 months ago)
One of the most beautiful places in the surroundings of Tbilisi. It is only 40 minutes from the western part of the city. In just less than an hour you will find your in completely different atmosphere from Tbilisi.
Charlotte Heffer (17 months ago)
Such a beautiful view from up here. Amazing to see the two rivers meeting. The monastery is typical, no info available in English on the significance, but great view.
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