Metekhi was one of the earliest inhabited areas on the Tbilisi's territory. According to traditional accounts, King Vakhtang I Gorgasali erected here a church and a fort which served also as a king’s residence; hence comes the name Metekhi which dates back to the 12th century and literally means “the area around the palace”. Tradition holds that it was also a site where the 5th-century martyr lady Saint Shushanik was buried. However, none of these structures have survived the Mongol invasion of 1235.

The extant Metekhi Church of Assumption, resting upon the top of the hill, was built by the Georgian king St Demetrius II circa 1278–1284 and is somewhat an unusual example of domed Georgian Orthodox church. It was later damaged and restored several times. King Rostom (r. 1633-1658) fortified the area around the church with a strong citadel garrisoned by some 3,000 soldiers. Under the Russian rule (established in 1801), the church lost its religious purpose and was used as a barracks (R. G. Suny, p. 93). The citadel was demolished in 1819 and replaced by a new building which functioned as the infamous jail down to the Soviet era, and was closed only in 1938.

The Metekhi church is a cross-cupola church. While this style was the most common throughout the Middle Ages, the Metekhi church is somewhat anachronistic with its three projecting apses in the east facade and the four freestanding pillars supporting the cupola within. The church is made of brick and dressed stone. The restoration of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries mostly employed brick. The facade is for the most part smooth, with decorative elements concentrated around the windows of the eastern apses. Horizontal bands below the gables run around all four sides and serve as a unifying element. The north portico of the main entrance is not a later addition but was built at the same time as the rest of the church.

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Founded: c. 1278
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Keny Raj (7 months ago)
Really nice for the view and the sunset. It's perfect for amazing pictures and you literally have a panoramic view of Tbilisi.
citizen of earth (8 months ago)
metekhi church is a Georgian Orthodox church located near the Mtkvari river, on Metekhi Cliff. it was built to be visible from many city points. it is near avlabari metro station. It was built on the remains of an earlier church constructed by King Vakhtang Gorgasali which was destroyed during the Mongol Invasion.
אביב לדרר (12 months ago)
The view from up here is definitely worth the climb. The church held a ceremony when we got there, but we took a glimpse and it looks very beautiful from the inside
Yonathan Stein (2 years ago)
Really nice for the view and the sunset. It's perfect for amazing pictures and you literally have a panoramic view of Tbilisi. Inside nothing especial but you can escape from the cold weather and rest a bit before keep going. Is easy to get there by foot also.
FRANK SH LEE (2 years ago)
Next to horse statue, You can see the beautiful river side view. Before the main gate of church, You can relax on the chair and see the view. It was a bit cold breeze but also It was special moment in my life. I saw a baptism(now sure) ceremony with baby. mood was kind and special shiny. Chandelier from central point also special amazing. This church was a bit different compare other church because it was quite bright compare other many church.
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