Metekhi was one of the earliest inhabited areas on the Tbilisi's territory. According to traditional accounts, King Vakhtang I Gorgasali erected here a church and a fort which served also as a king’s residence; hence comes the name Metekhi which dates back to the 12th century and literally means “the area around the palace”. Tradition holds that it was also a site where the 5th-century martyr lady Saint Shushanik was buried. However, none of these structures have survived the Mongol invasion of 1235.

The extant Metekhi Church of Assumption, resting upon the top of the hill, was built by the Georgian king St Demetrius II circa 1278–1284 and is somewhat an unusual example of domed Georgian Orthodox church. It was later damaged and restored several times. King Rostom (r. 1633-1658) fortified the area around the church with a strong citadel garrisoned by some 3,000 soldiers. Under the Russian rule (established in 1801), the church lost its religious purpose and was used as a barracks (R. G. Suny, p. 93). The citadel was demolished in 1819 and replaced by a new building which functioned as the infamous jail down to the Soviet era, and was closed only in 1938.

The Metekhi church is a cross-cupola church. While this style was the most common throughout the Middle Ages, the Metekhi church is somewhat anachronistic with its three projecting apses in the east facade and the four freestanding pillars supporting the cupola within. The church is made of brick and dressed stone. The restoration of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries mostly employed brick. The facade is for the most part smooth, with decorative elements concentrated around the windows of the eastern apses. Horizontal bands below the gables run around all four sides and serve as a unifying element. The north portico of the main entrance is not a later addition but was built at the same time as the rest of the church.

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Details

Founded: c. 1278
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Stefan Harde (5 months ago)
Lovly church in the middle of a cliff in Tiblisi.
Benaifer Bhoot (5 months ago)
Great place. Lovely churches n monasteries. Worth a visit. Do not miss.
Yogita Uchil (6 months ago)
Boat ride is the best after the Sun is down. The City of Tbilisi looked beautiful from the boat.
Meri Fard (7 months ago)
The view from this church is amazing
Avtar Singh (7 months ago)
It's beautiful place but changed to Ruins and still awesome. From here we can see whole Tiblisi and it's beauty. From Tiblisi airport by Bus or Taxi both are good to reach here because if you think taxi charging much money then you can bargain. when you reach here time goes very fast, it is a good spot to spend for couples
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