Kartlis Deda statue was erected on the top of Sololaki hill in 1958, the year Tbilisi celebrated its 1500th anniversary. Prominent Georgian sculptor Elguja Amashukeli designed the twenty-metre aluminium figure of a woman in Georgian national dress. She symbolizes the Georgian national character: in her left hand she holds a bowl of wine to greet those who come as friends, and in her right hand is a sword for those who come as enemies.

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Founded: 1958
Category: Statues in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maya Miftahova (7 months ago)
Awesome place with the panoramic view of Tbilisi. Great to get here in the evening, so the city is lighted
YJ Koh (7 months ago)
Love that she has a bowl (representing wine) in one hand and a sword in the other. Truly symbolic of the Georgian character
Mansour Alajmi (8 months ago)
Beautiful place, you can go there by cable car but there is nothing up there one the mother of Georgia. It's good place to take pictures and you can find some talent people up there with great shows. You can take good pictures of the city and it will be nice at night too. Need to visit
hamideh masumi (9 months ago)
You can use the cable car to climb. The city view from the top is very beautiful. After that, walk to other places.
A Bee (9 months ago)
Beautiful place, friendly people and cheap food. It's best not to go in the winter though because the icy cold weather ruined our walks around the area. I went with friends and I'm not Christian but I found out some really interesting facts from talking to the local people. We didn't pay for a guide. We did our own research and experienced it ourselves. Will go back again just to see the beauty of it.
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