Burgo de Osma Cathedral

Burgo de Osma, Spain

The Cathedral of Burgo de Osma is in the Gothic architectural style, and was constructed on an area previously occupied by a Romanesque church. It is one of the best preserved medieval buildings in the country and considered one of the best examples of thirteenth-century gothic architecture in Spain. The building of the church started in 1232, and was completed in 1784. The cloister is from 1512. The tower is from 1739. The cathedral is dedicated to the Assumption of Mary.

The latest additions are from the 18th century although the cathedral was built over a primitive 13th-century Romanesque temple, reason why there are so many interesting elements to see such as the main façade and its Renaissance-style door, its high tower, the altarpiece and the Gothic marble pulpit in the major chapel. Other works of art are the frescos in the dome, the Immaculate figure on the central altar which was brought from Rome, the Neoclassical sacristy, the Flamboyant Gothic cloister, beautiful stain glass windows on the upper part of the cathedral or the tomb of San Pedro de Osma, which is considered a masterpiece of funerary art. Inside the cathedral, there is also a museum with paintings and sculptures, as well as valuable codices such as the one known as “El Beato”.

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Founded: 1232
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Felicity Renshaw (9 months ago)
Beautiful example of 12th - 16th century architecture, with a fine museum of relics and vestments.
Martin Alcubierre (11 months ago)
Awesome
Malcolm Connop (12 months ago)
Beautiful place cafes restaurants, lots of history.
Juan Carlos Castillo Avila (12 months ago)
Its OK
Paul Yeaton (12 months ago)
A town of about 5000 with a cathedral. Spain
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