Encinas de Esgueva Castle

Encinas de Esgueva, Spain

Encinas Castle is dated back to the 14th century. The castle consists of a small and square enclosure, with two square towers in two of its corners. One of these served as the keep. In the other two corners the crenelated walls are raised to the same height as the two towers thus giving the false impression that the castle had four towers. There is a small stone ditch at the feet of the walls, which is provided with a low defensive wall.

In the 1950's the ruined castle was acquired by the Ministry of Agriculture. They restored it and turned it into a cereal silo. During these restorations however they blinded original windows and totally destroyed its medieval interior.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tino Martín (2 years ago)
Precioso castillo y pueblo. Buen embalse para pasar día de verano.
Angelito Rodriguez (2 years ago)
Gran aporte y esfuerzo de estos pequeños municipios a la conservación del patrimonio cultural
Francisco Suero Martínez (2 years ago)
Cuando fuimos estaba cerrado a cal y canto, fue la tarde del sábado. No pudimos visitar el interior. La zona exterior tiena tiene muy buena pinta y los alrededores están muy limpios y cuidados. Es una pena que un sábado por la tarde esté cerrado. No había ninguna indicación ni información alusiva a las visita. Estuvimos recorriendo la ruta de los castillos, que sí está señalizada, pero cuando llegas al lugar te lo encuentras cerrado. Una pena.
Jesus Manuel Cardenoso (2 years ago)
Muy bonito Bien conservado Aunque se hecha de menos el poder visitarlo por dentro. Seguro que daba más vida al pueblo
ialcuadrado Marketing digital (4 years ago)
Expectacular
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