Encinas de Esgueva Castle

Encinas de Esgueva, Spain

Encinas Castle is dated back to the 14th century. The castle consists of a small and square enclosure, with two square towers in two of its corners. One of these served as the keep. In the other two corners the crenelated walls are raised to the same height as the two towers thus giving the false impression that the castle had four towers. There is a small stone ditch at the feet of the walls, which is provided with a low defensive wall.

In the 1950's the ruined castle was acquired by the Ministry of Agriculture. They restored it and turned it into a cereal silo. During these restorations however they blinded original windows and totally destroyed its medieval interior.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alberto San Jose (18 months ago)
A historic castle. Very good care
Begoña Leal (19 months ago)
It is very well preserved but I do not know how to visit so it is a shame
Carlos Perez Martinez (19 months ago)
I only visited it from the outside it was closed, it looks good, the surroundings neat and clean
Paweł Tychek (3 years ago)
Beatifull place but unfortunetly closed
Tino Martín (3 years ago)
Precioso castillo y pueblo. Buen embalse para pasar día de verano.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.