Valbuena Abbey was founded in 1143 by Estefanía, daughter of Count Ermengol V of Urgell, and settled from Berdoues Abbey in France, of the filiation of Morimond. Valbuena received a number of privileges shortly after its foundation, and flourished to the point where it was able to settle three daughter houses of its own. 

In the 14th century a decline set in. Valbuena remained a daughter house of Berdoues until 1430, when the Castilian Cistercian Congregation was established; thereafter it was a daughter house of Poblet Abbey.

The abbey was dissolved under the anti-ecclesiastical Mendizábal government in 1835.

The church became a parish church. The conventual buildings passed into private ownership and were eventually acquired by a Baron Kessel, who sold them to Juan Pardo, who looked after them until 1950, when the Instituto Nacional de Colonización acquired the site and buildings for settlement purposes. In 1967 the Archdiocese of Valladolid took possession of the monastery buildings, and in 1990 leased them to the foundation Las Edades del Hombre.

The building complex, which was more or less complete by 1230, and most of which still stands, comprises the church, built from 1149 onwards, the conventual buildings, the guest wing, dormitories and the lay brothers' area. The groin-vaulted church of three aisles in four bays, with a barrel-vaulted transept and a crossing which was heightened in the Renaissance and covered with a cupola, is largely in accordance with the usual Cistercian building practice. The church also has an unusually large semi-circular apse, between two smaller semi-circular side apses, and also a rectangular side-chapel, built in 1165. The nave is in the early Gothic style. The west front has a portal with a pointed arch and several archivolts, over which is a large oculus in a blind arch.

The chapter house and the day room are also groin-vaulted, while the refectory on the south side of the complex has a pointed barrel-vaulted roof of four bays. The cloister has two storeys. The Capilla San Pedro chapel contains an arcosolium with a mural of a king from the period of around 1270. The lay brothers' wing was removed in the Renaissance to make room for a second courtyard. By the river stand the ruins of the abbot's house, dating from the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 1143
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charlotte Tamason (10 months ago)
Beautiful! The restaurant and breakfast were exceptional too.
Rafael Fernandez (10 months ago)
Great food and attention. Wine from the region is exceptional!
Jackie Dias (11 months ago)
The monastery sits within its own vineyards stretching over various hectares of land. Truly magnificent building with incredible frescos. Beautiful cloisters and other areas renovated to receive guests in style. Private vineyard (in 4WD) and winery tours to learn about their own wines. Stunning winery concept not to be missed. Definitely worth a stop off even if it is to only visit the winery!
Kasper Mundt-Nielsen (12 months ago)
One of my favorite hotels ever. Beautiful location, the rooms are extravagant and the spa is lovely. A bit negative is the late breakfast (which is luxurious and wonderful) at 8 and I don’t believe the evening kitchen is up to the standard of the hotel. Still 5/5.
Pablo Sanz (13 months ago)
Great hotel. Very good spa, although not complete unless you pay upgrades. An espectacular venue for weddings.
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