Peñafiel Castle

Peñafiel, Spain

Construction works for Peñafiel Castle commenced in the 10th century, although the contemporary structure underwent major interventions during the 14th and 15th centuries. This medieval fortress was declared a National Monument in 1917 and currently stands as a veritable emblem of wine tourism in Ribera del Duero.

Peñafiel and its castle were key defensive locations along river Duero, both for Christians and Muslims in the 9th and 10thcenturies. Sitting atop the hill, the castle controlled the valleys of rivers Duero, Duratón and Botijas, and protected the population.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.turismopenafiel.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jhivan Pargass (2 years ago)
A lovely historical landmark - the tour was a bit boring and rushed, though, as if the guide had done it so many times he just didn't really care about whether he was engaging or if people heard everything he said or not. Still, a wonderful place to visit. Great views of the town.
Joshua Lyon (2 years ago)
Outside of the castle is beautiful. Tour was only in Spanish and no printed or audio guides to assist, so if you don't speak Spanish you are forced through 30-45 minutes of a tour you can't understand. Inside the castle was ok, but all seemed to be recently refurbished with modern floors, etc. The main lower portion of the castle is turned into a wine tour
Filip Van Bouwel (2 years ago)
Really cool castle. Very unique shape. The tour was only in Spanish, but we got English papers to follow along and the guide would often quickly tell us stuff in English while walking in between different locations. Very nice views from the top of the tower. I highly recommend this.
Bonnie Shapiro (2 years ago)
Wow! What an impressive place! We had Sofia as our guide and had a fenomenal time, she gave us such a lesson in history of he town and he castle with fun facts and great stories. The castle is very well kept and the visit was 45 minutes of amazing views ! Please call to check their schedule for the visits. We missed out on trying wines at the museum which is also a must in the region.
Klaus Bellinghausen (3 years ago)
Nice history, great place to visit and if you like wine, there is wine tasting store accessible. I got the feeling that the focus is more for wine than the castle. The 45 min guided (only) tour is in Spanish only. no exploring on your own. One simple English printed page does not go along with the tour. How difficult and inexpensive would it be to have an audio tape in English complimenting the tour. It was sad to realize that English speaking guest are not really welcome and/or considered with respect. It was not great especially after driving for hours. Thank goodness there was an unexpected tread, a giant church in town, giant in enormous Absolutely a historical enjoyment, look for the Cayman on the wall, and lit some of the LED candles for your love ones.
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