Cristo del Otero

Palencia, Spain

The Cristo del Otero (Christ of the Knoll) is a large sculpture and symbol of the city of Palencia. It was built in 1931 according to the project of sculptor Victorio Macho. It has a style reminiscent of Art Deco with Cubist resonances and echoes of ancient Egyptian art in the hieratic pose of the figure.

It is one of the highest statues of Jesus Christ in the world. At his feet is carved a chapel (called Santa Maria del Otero) and a small museum with items by the architect. At the entrance to the chapel is a small terrace and a gazebo there is the view of the city.

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Details

Founded: 1931
Category: Statues in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerard Fleming (18 months ago)
It's about 50 minutes walk from Suances motorhome parking. You don't actually get near the statue but the is lovely views of the city and the flat plains beyond.
Juan Carlos Rojo Aguado (2 years ago)
expectacular.
ian tudor (2 years ago)
The third largest statue of Jesus Christ So it's well worth a visit..
Helena (2 years ago)
The world's third largest Jesus will not disappoint! See the Lord on top of a hill on the outskirts of a minor town. The Big Jesus was impressive in its artistic style, seen in the impressive architecture. There is a museum at the feet of Jesus to explain the design of the Third Largest Jesus in the world (behind the one in Rio Di Janeiro and another massive Jesus) with information in Spanish (not surprising seeing as it is in Spain). The view was also amazing. The only disturbing thing about this particularly large son of the Lord was that He had no eyes in his eye sockets. This was so people could look out of them, but from a distance he doesn't look how Jesus has been traditionally depicted (i.e. with eyes). This humongous third of the Holy Trinity was overall very good.
Dani Griffin (4 years ago)
Jesus!
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