Fuensaldaña Castle

Fuensaldaña, Spain

Fuensaldaña Castle construction started in the 13th century, but it is not until the 15th century that the structure acquires today's configuration. It was built by the Vivero family. The family became linked to the region's history when the future Catholic Monarchs got married in their castle.

Inside, the building was shaped as a 'U' around the cortyard, which today has been made into the parliament floor. During the Comunidades war, it was peacefully occupied by the comunero troops. The castle was the General Assembly of Castilla y León.

Inside the keep are four vaulted halls out of ashlar masonry. The keep, like the curtain walls, is also equipped with round towers at its corners, two nice turrets and battlements.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Laurinda Lee (12 months ago)
Very nicely restaured castle, all the media and exhibition was very contemporany, went on a open doors weekend so it was quiet a busy day. A few nice books, pity we didn’t get to see them for in open doors day it’s really crowded! Very nice staff, helpfull and orienting visitors.
David Angulo Duque (12 months ago)
The castle has been recently opened, in February 2019. It was remodelled into a interpretation center of castles. The visit is a must because you will learn about Valladolid castles and the vivero's family which were the builders of this building.
Arun Prasad (2 years ago)
Beautiful fields and scenes all around
Rigoberto Banuelos (2 years ago)
Very nice castle. The surrounding area is also very nice. The town is very small and has alot of charm. There is currently some construction on the castle but otherwise everything is pristine. The tour of the castle is great. I would recommend visiting this castle.
Tracy ShafferEscalante (3 years ago)
Nice little museum. However it is now closed to the public.
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