Montealegre de Campos Castle

Montealegre de Campos, Spain

The castle of Montealegre, built in the 12th century, was mentioned for the first time in 1173, when Rodrígo Gutiérrez was appointed lord of Montealegre; together with the castles of Ampudia, Belmonte, Torremormojón, Medina de Rioseco, Mucientes and Trigueros, it formed the defence line of the southern border of the Kingdom of León. The castle was revamped in 1297 by Alfonso Tello Pérez de Meneses, appointed lord of Montealegre by King Alfonso VIII.

In the 13th century, the domain was transferred to the Order of Saint James, which granted a charter to the village in 1219. Further owners of Montealegre were the Albuquerque (14th century), who defended the castle against King of Castile Peter the Cruel in 1354, and the Manuel (15th-17th centuries). The Manuel family maintained in the town one of the most significant Jewish communities in the province. In 1626, Montealegre became a Marquisate, granted by King Philip IV to Martín de Rojas y Guzmán.

The present castle, with its austere and strong appearance, has a slightly trapezial groundplan, with four strong towers at its corners. Three of them are rectangular and the fourth is pentagonal and served as the keep. In the middle of its curtain walls it is fitted with slender circular towers. The height of its walls range from 18 to 24 meters with a thickness of 4 meters. With its functional and horizontal impression it represents an adoption of a Mediterranean-Arab castle, a style known in Europe from the 13th century.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edgardo Fiol (3 years ago)
Que castillo. Imperdible la paz y las vistas
Manu (3 years ago)
Castillo vositable, pero solo los fines de semana, exteriormente se encuentra en perfecto estado, actualmente alberga una exposición y explicaciones de los comuneros.
Alex Fuentes (3 years ago)
El castillo es espectacular pero no así los accesos. Mala señalización y la calle estrecha. En autocaravana hay que tener cuidado con los coches aparcados y las fachadas.
Mari Carmen Sanchez Zaldivar (3 years ago)
La guía muy atenta, dando toda la información que se le requeria.
Keith Webb (4 years ago)
Wow!
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