Torrelobatón Castle

Torrelobatón, Spain

Torrelobatón Castle is one of the most important and best-preserved fortresses in Valladolid. In the historical epic film El Cid with Charlton Heston the castle played the role of Vivar, hometown of El Cid.

The castle was begun in 1406, when Don Alfonso Enríquez, 1st Admiral of Castile, obtained licence from John II to erect a fortress in Torrelobatón; the only fortification there was a modest stone enclosure surrounding the village. The castle was involved in the Revolt of the Comuneros against Charles I (Holy Roman Emperor Charles V).

It has a square ground-plan, with circular turrets at three of the corners and the keep set into the fourth, protecting the gate. The castle was surrounded by an enceinte, of which there are some remains, and a ditch, now mostly filled in. The entrance to the Torrelobaton Castle courtyard is through a gate with a round-headed arch protected by a portcullis. The keep is the most interesting feature of the fortress. Of considerable height, the upper part is protected by eight turrets supported on accordion brackets, one at each corner and one in the middle of each wall.

 

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Details

Founded: 1406
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edgardo Fiol (3 years ago)
Un castillo hermoso. Te permiten visitarlo completo. Incluso hasta lo más alto de la torre. Imperdible. Sólo 3 euros
Oscar Martin Sanz (3 years ago)
Castillo bien conservado en el que cuentan la revuelta comunera contra el rey. Es visita interactiva donde te hacen una introducción por parte de la persona que está allí y luego visitas a tu aire el castillo. Vista impresionante de toda la zona.
Leonardo Villavicencio (4 years ago)
I really loved the chance to visit such a well maintained place. Well preserved bit of history at a comfortable price
David s (4 years ago)
Great castle in superior condition! We stayed right next to it in a campervan, had a quiet night and good sleep.
Lorena BG (5 years ago)
Ok
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