Santa María de La Vid Monastery

La Vid y Barrios, Spain

Santa María de La Vid is a monastery in Spain's Duero Valley was founded on a different site, a place called Montesacro, in about 1146 by Domingo Gómez, illegitimate son of Queen Urraca of León and Castile and her lover Count Gómez González de Candespina. Domingo had become interested in the Praemonstratensian order on a visit to France, and this was the first Praemonstratensian house in Spain.

The monastery was moved to its present site in 1152, having been given the estate of La Vid by Alfonso VII of León and Castile, who was the half-brother of Domingo Gómez. It was closed as a result of the ecclesiastical confiscations of Mendizábal in the 1830s. It was re-opened in the 1860s by the Augustinians who still inhabit it.

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Details

Founded: 1152
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mónica PR (8 months ago)
Because you can't put 10 stars that if you didn't get them ... Excellent place to visit. Hotel a 10 and restaurant a 10. Incredible quality / price. Treatment of the staff equally excellent. Congratulations.
Alien1717 (8 months ago)
Monasterio muy bonito. Recomiendo verlo. Alguna mezcla de estilos pues es muy antiguo siglo xII y posteriormente ampliado. La talla de la virgen de la vid tiene la expresión más dulce que he visto hasta la fecha. Mínimo de visita 2 personas. Es desconcertante porque si quieres verlo podrías pagar doble para verlo pero son muy rigurosos al respecto son 2 y menos te niegan la visita.
Juan Ángel Omeñaca Cacho (9 months ago)
Very pretty
Marion Scott (2 years ago)
It was closed when we were there, but a beautiful outside and gardens
Maite Sánchez Sánchez (2 years ago)
Q voy a decir sobre este lugar es una cita para mí tan importante todos los primeros sábados de junio q me encanta , el monasterio tiene mucha historia situado en un lugar precioso privilegiado con el Duero a sus pies , tiene hospedería es un lugar tan especial q quien va repite y sobre todo la Virgen Santa María de la vid es una belleza
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