Santa María de Gradefes

Gradefes, Spain

Founded in 1168, the building of the Santa María de Gradefes Church, according to an engraving on the northern lower wall, began on March 1st, 1177 under the patronage of the woman who became its Abbess -Teresa Pérez, widow of García Pérez, a knight of Alfonso VII. The first community was made up of Cistercian nuns who came from the monastery of Tulebras, Navarra. It became an important and privileged female monastery.

It is the only example in Spain of a female monastery having an ambulatory. In the church are the tombs with statues of the founding couple, a polychromatic work from the late 13th century. Kept in the monastery rooms are the polychromatic wooden carvings of a 12th century Virgin and a Gothic Christ, formerly part of a Calvary from the 14th century.

Valuable sculptures from the twelfth century. Fourteenth century tombs. Virgen de las Angustias (sixteenth century). Chalices, crucifixes and lignum crucis (largest section of the cross).

In monastic dependencies are kept polychrome carvings of a Virgin of the XII century and a Gothic Christ which was part of a Calvary of the XIV. Garments and shoes belonging to the founder are also kept.

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Gradefes, Spain
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Details

Founded: 1168
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismocastillayleon.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Omar Valle (6 months ago)
A small monastery with tremendous charm, a mixture of three styles and a very interesting history. Today we were able to enjoy a guided tour with a very nice local guide with great knowledge of art and history, thanks Carlos.
Isaadepas (6 months ago)
Small but beautiful monastery that with the explanations of the guide is more interesting, they sell honey and sweets that the nuns make very good
Juan Val (11 months ago)
Beautiful monastery. We were lucky that no one was there and we were able to visit it by ourselves, and the truth is that it was a pleasure. It can be seen from another part but it seems that it is only seen in guided group tours, so if you plan your visit in advance you will be able to see everything and visit it with the explanation of a guide. Recommended to visit it!
Nieves Garcia Gonzalez (2 years ago)
Carisimo
MUSEO TEXTIL VAL (2 years ago)
Estuvimos el domingo, una visita guiada excelente, el guía de turismo encantador. Repetiremos y recomendaré la visita.
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