Santa María de Gradefes

Gradefes, Spain

Founded in 1168, the building of the Santa María de Gradefes Church, according to an engraving on the northern lower wall, began on March 1st, 1177 under the patronage of the woman who became its Abbess -Teresa Pérez, widow of García Pérez, a knight of Alfonso VII. The first community was made up of Cistercian nuns who came from the monastery of Tulebras, Navarra. It became an important and privileged female monastery.

It is the only example in Spain of a female monastery having an ambulatory. In the church are the tombs with statues of the founding couple, a polychromatic work from the late 13th century. Kept in the monastery rooms are the polychromatic wooden carvings of a 12th century Virgin and a Gothic Christ, formerly part of a Calvary from the 14th century.

Valuable sculptures from the twelfth century. Fourteenth century tombs. Virgen de las Angustias (sixteenth century). Chalices, crucifixes and lignum crucis (largest section of the cross).

In monastic dependencies are kept polychrome carvings of a Virgin of the XII century and a Gothic Christ which was part of a Calvary of the XIV. Garments and shoes belonging to the founder are also kept.

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Gradefes, Spain
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Details

Founded: 1168
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismocastillayleon.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raul A. P. (6 months ago)
Beautiful Monastery that your visit makes your mind go back to times past (with feelings of very cold).
Isabel Rodríguez (8 months ago)
Beautiful monastery, still inhabited by nuns, very well preserved, the guided tour is very well explained
Marta Hernández (8 months ago)
Wonderful architecture and magnificent explanation from the guide (it is a guided tour)
Jesús Martínez Vargas (8 months ago)
A memorable guided tour of this gem of Cistercian art
Olga Maria Ropero (2 years ago)
Precioso monasterio cuya iglesia puede visitarse. Austera y de líneas sobrias como corresponde a su estilo arquitectónico, es un lugar que transmite paz
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