Church of Our Lady of Angels

Poreč, Croatia

Church of Our Lady of Angels is a 1770 Baroque structure built on the remains of an earlier Romanesque church. It features Baroque altars and paintings, among which the most valuable are the 18th century Immaculate Conception by St. Peter by Jacopo Marieschi and Moses with the Serpent of Brass by Venetian painter Gaspare Vecchio, originally from the Poreč Cathedral.

 

 

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Address

Trg Slobode 1, Poreč, Croatia
See all sites in Poreč

Details

Founded: 1770
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

www.myporec.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kelvin Ferguson (4 years ago)
Very interesting
Barrie Moore (4 years ago)
A must see whilst here
James Green (4 years ago)
Located on a central square in Porec, there always seems to be something going on here. Street food and busker performances. It makes a great spot to relax and enjoy the beautiful sunshine and warn atmosphere. Lots of restaurants and bars nearby. Lovely spot. Hope to get back there soon
Marino Kocijancic (4 years ago)
perfect
Alan Mccafferty (5 years ago)
Great place for food and drinks at reasonable prices
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