Belaj castle was mentioned in 1367 as Bray in a document by Aquileia patriarch in which was given away for one year to the nobleman and vassal Dujam of St. Vito from Rijeka. After the Uskok War (1615–17) in which was devastated castel St. Martin (Posert), previous center of Belaj estate, Daniel Barbo in the vicinity built this castle as a new residence. It was in the possession of his descendants until 1668 when along Paz, Čepić, and Kožljak was sold toJohann Weikhard from Auersperg noble family. All this castles and estates Johann united in a single manor Wachsenstein (Kožljak), and the center from the medieval castle Kožljak by which was named, was transferred to Belaj. Johann heirs reconstructed the castle in the Baroque style to rustic castle in the end of 17th and 18th century. It was in their property until 1945 when the Yugoslav government nationalized it and given to the use of local agricultural cooperative.

Today the castle is a registered monument of cultural heritage, privately owned, partially renovated and very well preserved. The central residential part of the palace is of rectangular layout, 40 by 20 metres, with four-storey wings. On three sides of the inner courtyard is closed by semicircular arcades on the ground floor and first floor, while the north-west wing entrance closes with facade decorated with stone portal and shallow attic with a distaff and a bell from the 18th century when the wing was upgraded for one floor. The appearance of the castle before the intervention was preserved in the Valvasor drawing from 1679. The walls of the gallery on the first floor until recently were painted landscapes depicting the castle and its surroundings. Left and right of the residential palace in the same line are located farm buildings with basements, stables and barns, which are connected with the castle high surrounding walls. These are long and narrow single-storey buildings with gabled roof.

On the ground floor is the chapel of St. Henry II, with baroque marble altar and painted altarpiece, tombstones of family Barbo and tombstones of noble families from Kršan, Kožljak and Paz transmitted in Belaj from St. Mary on Čepić lake after the closure of the Paulistsmonastery in 1783.

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Address

Belaj, Cerovlje, Croatia
See all sites in Cerovlje

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luigi Bross (13 months ago)
Stunning castle, great wines, pleasant owner
Jose Alday (13 months ago)
Just ok. Nothing really special.
BetterMeHrvatska (14 months ago)
Great local restaurant and historical venue. Good idea to spend the entire day on walking, exploring and tasting something new!
Irina Heifets (2 years ago)
What a lovely way to spend Sunday afternoon with friends! Great food friendly service and lovely country surrounding. One of the highlights of our visit to Istria.
Masa Medancic (2 years ago)
Thank you for being perfect the hosts at our dream wedding. The food, the wine, the venue and the service were nothing but amazing and we couldn’t be happier with how your team had treated us. Big thumbs up and keep up the good work:)
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