St. Francis Monastery

Pula, Croatia

On the slope of the hill between the Forum Square and the upper circular street, lies the monastic complex dedicated to St. Francis of Assisi, built in the 14th century at the site of a previous cultic edifice. The Franciscan community was first recorded in Pula in the 13th century. The church was built in 1314 in the late Romanesque style with Gothic ornaments, as a firm and simple building of the preaching Franciscan order. The finely cut stone blocks used for building the walls speak of the skilful masters who took part in the construction.

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Founded: 1314
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steven Degeling (2 years ago)
Oldest church of Istria.
Mislav Džapo (2 years ago)
Very nice! :)
Jeremy Schreuders (3 years ago)
Tha garden of the monastery is beautifull and there are lots of cute turtles walking around in it.
Manuel Spier (3 years ago)
Almost hidden away oasis of peace. Small, but cozy and lovely monastery with pretty architecture, a tortoise garden, and a small archaeological site inside.
Brady Santoro (3 years ago)
Beautiful little church. It is also, I believe, an active Franciscan monastery, so please respect the location and its inhabitants. The church itself [the actual church, not the compound] is beautiful, the interior plain and simple, with a gilded Gothic altar, and a wooden crucifix. Flanking the altar are devotional statues of Mary and St. Francis himself, and on the walls are the Stations of the Cross. Outside, you can see various pieces of stonework, and in the cloister, the resident turtles. It does not take a long time to visit, and I believe there is admission, what is it, I cannot recall.
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