Nesactium was an ancient fortified town and hill fort of the Histri tribe. In pre-Roman times, Nesactium, ruled by its legendary king Epulon, was the capital of the tribal population of the peninsula called Histri, who were also connected to the prehistoric Castellieri culture. Some theories state a later Celtic influence, but who they were and where they came from has never been discovered for certain. It is believed that their main economic activities were trade and piracy all over the ancient Mediterranean Sea.

In 177 BC, the town was conquered by the Romans and destroyed. Rebuilt upon the original Histrian pattern, it was a Roman town until 46–45 BC, when the Ancient Greek colony Polai was elevated to Pietas Iulia, today Pula. The town was located on the ancient road Via Flavia, which connected Trieste to Dalmatia. The area was abandoned by the Romans in the 6th century, following the Slav invasions.

At the end of the fourth century, the walls were renewed. Two churches were added, next to each other, between the bathhouse and the forum. The southern one, the largest, was probably dedicated to Mary and used for the daily ceremonies; the northern one was used for baptisms and religious ceremonies. There are traces of fire, which may have something to do with the Avar attacks on Histria in 600 and 611.

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Nezakcij, Ližnjan, Croatia
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Details

Founded: 9th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zdravka M (11 months ago)
Great location but lacks more details / historical data and attractions such as location or photos of other finds of former urban villas on the southern slope. I also suggest that the fence not be locked. Anyway, the side path is a path ...
NatBan (13 months ago)
worth, old temples
Harry's Wanderlust (14 months ago)
Beautiful archeological site. Would love to see more being excavated. Be sure to buy one of the small books (have 30 Kuna with you. The site host doesn't have change!) with great information and give the site host a tip! Such a friendly guy! And the site is just amazing!
Samo Kaliciak (15 months ago)
Krásne miesto je úchvatne stáť na mieste kde pred vyše tisíc rokmi stála tak makestátna budova. Môžem len odporučiť
deadly applepie (15 months ago)
Wenn man in der Gegend ist, dann gerne besuchen und die Fantasie spielen lassen. Man kann sich das Gelände noch sehr gut vorstellen, wie es wohl mal aussah, da so gut wie alle Grundmauern und die Mauer um das Gelände noch ganz gut stehen und zu erkennen sind. Leider gibt es nur eine Info Tafel und das wirklich "kleine" Museum. Wenn man ein paar mehr Infotafeln mit Informationen etc. zu den einzelnen Gebäuden und der Zeit aufstellen würde, dann könnte man dieses Ziel sicher attraktiver für Touristen machen. Mir hat es trotzdem gut gefallen, da ich gerade in der Ecke war. Extra hingefahren wäre ich ehrlicherweise im Nachgang aber nicht.
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