Pula Fortress

Pula, Croatia

Pula fortress was built by the Venetians, situated on a hill in the center of Pula. It is interesting to point out that there are evidence that hill fort of the Histri was once in the same location. Because of its dominating position, the fortress was always used for defense of the city, bay and port. The fortress was built between 1630 and 1633, based on a design from French military engineer Antonio De Villa, so it belongs to the French style. It was always an important defensive point for Venetian control of the Adriatic. The stone from large Roman theater was used for its construction, along with the one from other quarries around Pula.

The center of the fortress has a rectangular shape, and four additional pentagonal tower increase its security. From aerial perspective, the fortress has a shape of a flower. The fortress was reconstructed several times. Even though there is a sing in the entrance with year 1840, it was built before. In Austrian-Hungarian times, the fortress is called Hafen Kastell, and in other half of the 19th century, it received new armament, penitentiary, guardhouse and other objects. It was part of Pula’s fortification system. After the end of World War I, the fortress has lost its significance.

Today it houses since the Historical Museum of Istria. The museum has several departments – Department of the history of Pula, Department of medieval Istrian history and the Department of modern Istrian history with adjoining collections. In the rich museum holdings (over 40,000 artifacts), particularly important is the collection of old postcards, maps and the collection of arms, uniforms, military and maritime equipment.

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Address

Gradinski uspon 10, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 1630-1633
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Djordjevic (2 years ago)
Very interesting place to visit on Brioni island.
corinniii (2 years ago)
Its just a rest of the castle. We didnt find it that worth it. But the view over Pula is great! And you will see the amphi theatre
Helena (2 years ago)
Great view from the tower and the wall over the city. The museum inside looked interesting, but sadly it wasn't translated much.
ABOriginal Crew (2 years ago)
Old Austo-Hungarian fortress in the center of city of Pula is one in a series of fortresses who was supose to protect the city from enemies. Now is a museum dedicatet to the sea and Pula's history. It's placed on top of the hill and conected to the Zero Strasse witch is complex of underground tunels. If you are in Pula you need to visit this place.
Ladislav Vašina (2 years ago)
Entrance for adults is 20Kn, Students 10Kn, Children 5Kn, view is great from there, free toilets are also located in the fortress.
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