Pula Fortress

Pula, Croatia

Pula fortress was built by the Venetians, situated on a hill in the center of Pula. It is interesting to point out that there are evidence that hill fort of the Histri was once in the same location. Because of its dominating position, the fortress was always used for defense of the city, bay and port. The fortress was built between 1630 and 1633, based on a design from French military engineer Antonio De Villa, so it belongs to the French style. It was always an important defensive point for Venetian control of the Adriatic. The stone from large Roman theater was used for its construction, along with the one from other quarries around Pula.

The center of the fortress has a rectangular shape, and four additional pentagonal tower increase its security. From aerial perspective, the fortress has a shape of a flower. The fortress was reconstructed several times. Even though there is a sing in the entrance with year 1840, it was built before. In Austrian-Hungarian times, the fortress is called Hafen Kastell, and in other half of the 19th century, it received new armament, penitentiary, guardhouse and other objects. It was part of Pula’s fortification system. After the end of World War I, the fortress has lost its significance.

Today it houses since the Historical Museum of Istria. The museum has several departments – Department of the history of Pula, Department of medieval Istrian history and the Department of modern Istrian history with adjoining collections. In the rich museum holdings (over 40,000 artifacts), particularly important is the collection of old postcards, maps and the collection of arms, uniforms, military and maritime equipment.

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Address

Gradinski uspon 10, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 1630-1633
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sebastjan Ugrin (10 months ago)
One of the most scenic points of Pula that offers a view on all the city with the famous arena just beside it. You can imagine how Pula looked alike in the past when it was the Austrohungarian main port, bit civilian and military. The fortress itself is well preserved with a nice bar/restaurant, but during Saturdays you can easily meet couples getting married there so it is not the best day for a visit. Parking is in front of the fortress, suitable for all, even small children.
Dillon Vander Feen (10 months ago)
Really great views of the city the walk around the fort is very easy-going.
Nick vB (10 months ago)
Great place to check out! Though most of the best parts are outside the walls and are accessible to the public whenever you like. You can walk around, over ruins and through what used to be a moat. There is also a ruin of a small Roman theatre next to it. To go inside is 20kn and it's probably only the view from the tower that makes it worthwhile. The exhibits are few and there's nothing about the history of the castle/fortress and not much to see inside.
Zoli Bartha (10 months ago)
It offers a nice view of the city, but you can get the same view by walking around it. You will not lose much if you miss it.
my travelisso (2 years ago)
Place a bit off the main track so it's quiet and not very crowded. Great views of the port, amphitheatre and surroundings. Inside you will find museum of history of Istria. Out on the walls you could take a blanket and have a picnic on the grass there - you could see people doing that, enjoying the views.
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