St. Blaise Church

Vodnjan, Croatia

One of the most impressive structures in Vodnjan and entire Istria is certainly the parish church of St. Blaise, well-known to pilgrims from all over the world. On the site of the present-day parish church once stood a basilica, most probably from the 11th century, that was pulled down in 1760. The new church was modelled after the Venetian church of San Pietro, and the project itself cost 13,000 gold coins. The church was financed by the townspeople and its construction lasted from 1760 to 1800. At that time the locals set aside 10% for the building of the church, whereas over the next ten years they set aside 10% of wine and olive oil. Today this church is the largest and one of the most magnificent ones in Istria.

Apart from the relics of St. Blaise, Vodnjan's parish church also keeps 370 relics belonging to 250 different saints. In addition to one of the thorns from Jesus' crown, fragment of the Holy Virgin's veil, particle of Jesus' Cross and many others, a special attraction are the desiccated remains of saints whose bodies or body parts have been completely preserved: St. Sebastian, St. Barbara, St. Mary of Egypt, St. Leon Bembo, St. Giovanni Olini and St. Nicolosa Bursa. These remains in St. Blaise's Church have been there for centuries, without being embalmed or hermetically sealed which presents a true mystery for scientists. However, this is not the only mystery. According to legend the preserved bodies of saints are considered to have magical powers.

In 1818 the saintly relics were brought to Vodnjan from Venice, since everything sacral was destroyed because of the French Revolution. The great painter and member of the Royal imperial academy of fine arts, Gaetano Grezler from Venice took charge of the relics and stored them. In search of an artist that would decorate the newly-built parish church, Vodnjan's Church Fathers chose Gretzler. He arrived by sailing ship, bringing with him the relics.

The Collection of Sacral Art in the parish church of St. Blaise is the most magnificent one in Croatia. There are over 730 exhibits dating from the period between the year 400 and the 19th century. The collection comprises stone reliefs, fifteen paintings on canvas and wood, fifteen sculptures, some hundred precious reliquaries, numerous books and manuscripts, jewellery, vestments, etc, presenting a complete picture of the Middle Ages. Although St. Blaise's Church hasn't been officially proclaimed a place of pilgrimage 15,000 worshippers visit the church every year.

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Details

Founded: 1760
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

www.istria-culture.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Frank van Egmond (7 months ago)
Impressive place and relics. The priest is very kind and respectable ??. The audio tour was good. I would have liked to be able to read more descriptions of the relics themselves.
Luka B. (7 months ago)
Reading some of the comments I get the impression that they are expecting some kind of fireworks, a show on the main lav from St Blaise's Church. The best comments are that the church is closed, the ticket man rude or the mummies are different to those in Egypt. People, especially our Slav brothers from Poland or the Czech Republic, get a grip on yourselves. This is the highest church in Istria and it has mummies, so a 10 euro entrance fee is a fair price to pay to keep the relics in suitable conditions. You can always pray on a bench and have a lovely time following the trail of murals. Pozdrawiam Rodaków!
Tanja Matić (7 months ago)
The city remained in a forgotten time. The church is truly magical with several hundred relics and a copy of the Shroud of Turin. Really fascinating. You must experience it
Alex Izo (Alessandro Izo) (12 months ago)
Great historical village, beauty cathedral but I am in disagree the condition for to pay a lot for to entry inside in the church
Beaudine Verspeet (2 years ago)
Terrible experience! The guide was very very rude. I think he hung out too much with the mummies there. Don’t mix up the three mummies with the real one (aka the guide) ?
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