Brijuni Kastrum

Pula, Croatia

The richest site by its strata on the Brijuni stretches on an area somewhat greater than 1 hectare. Finds from the period of the Roman Republic and Empire, Late Antiquity, Eastern Goths, Byzantium, Carolingian period and Venice testify to the long time settlement. The first villa in Dobrika Bay was built in the 1st century BC. 

During Augustus' rule, partly on the site of the first villa, a new villa rustica was erected (size 51x59 meters) with a central courtyard and equipment for producing olive oil and wine, as well as cellars, and modestly arranged housing units.

Life within the villa went on until the end of the 4th century when due to social changes the villa grew into a closely-built-type settlement with houses, olive and grapes processing plants, storage rooms, workshops, blacksmith workshop, ovens, briefly, all elements necessary for an independent life of a community. The settlement gradually grew, and strong walls were erected for its protection. Apart from the main, northeastern entrance, there were four other gates that were connected within the settlement, and smaller squares were also formed. St. Mary's basilica, erected in the close vicinity was to serve  the cultic needs of the numerous population of the castrum.

The Frankish rule at the end of the 8th century introduced a new feudal property. The walls of the Carolingian villa were articulated by lesenes, while oil, at the time, was produced in the rooms by the sea. The entire process of oil production, from grinding of olives in the mill to pressing in one of the three presses is depicted here.

Life in the castrum was last evidenced during the Venetians. 

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Address

Brijuni, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 100-0 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

www.np-brijuni.hr

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Hodson (14 months ago)
Huge site and many interesting building shapes. Wish we knew what each one was.
Tamás Füzesi (15 months ago)
This is a second ruin near the temple ruins. Take a look at the information table next to the gate then take some pictures. Then if you have swim suits, I recommend to climb down to the beach through this ruins and go swim a little. Just be careful because there is a restricted area near it!
Kevin Cox (15 months ago)
Old ruin, only the foundations remain. You do get a sense of the scale of the things that used to be here though. On the perimeter there are some large stone walls that you can climb, this takes a bit of effort but the view is worth it. Nice place to take pictures.
Melissa Paul (15 months ago)
What a fascinating historical location to visit! Wandering through this well-preserved ancient community was a powerful experience. Dating from the 1st century, you can see how smart and resourceful the culture was...
uskok68 (16 months ago)
Great location. A lot to see there. Some additional explanations would be nice. Only one at the entrance.
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