Brijuni Kastrum

Pula, Croatia

The richest site by its strata on the Brijuni stretches on an area somewhat greater than 1 hectare. Finds from the period of the Roman Republic and Empire, Late Antiquity, Eastern Goths, Byzantium, Carolingian period and Venice testify to the long time settlement. The first villa in Dobrika Bay was built in the 1st century BC. 

During Augustus' rule, partly on the site of the first villa, a new villa rustica was erected (size 51x59 meters) with a central courtyard and equipment for producing olive oil and wine, as well as cellars, and modestly arranged housing units.

Life within the villa went on until the end of the 4th century when due to social changes the villa grew into a closely-built-type settlement with houses, olive and grapes processing plants, storage rooms, workshops, blacksmith workshop, ovens, briefly, all elements necessary for an independent life of a community. The settlement gradually grew, and strong walls were erected for its protection. Apart from the main, northeastern entrance, there were four other gates that were connected within the settlement, and smaller squares were also formed. St. Mary's basilica, erected in the close vicinity was to serve  the cultic needs of the numerous population of the castrum.

The Frankish rule at the end of the 8th century introduced a new feudal property. The walls of the Carolingian villa were articulated by lesenes, while oil, at the time, was produced in the rooms by the sea. The entire process of oil production, from grinding of olives in the mill to pressing in one of the three presses is depicted here.

Life in the castrum was last evidenced during the Venetians. 

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Brijuni, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 100-0 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

www.np-brijuni.hr

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulrich Scherer (2 years ago)
Beeindruckend große Anlage mit Ruinen aus vielen Jahrhunderten.
Doram Jacoby (3 years ago)
A great place to have a break on the trip to the island.
Ilario Bonomi (3 years ago)
Notevoli resti di basamenti di edifici (di tutte le tipologie, dalle abitazioni alle botteghe alle officine di fabbri, ai panifici, ai molini per l'olio e il grano) su un'area piuttosto vasta, con splendida vista sul mare. Il tutto circondato da ben conservati resti di mura (di epoca più tarda). Abitato ancora nel secolo XIII. Da non perdere!
Christian Werner (3 years ago)
Nice bit of history waterside. Worth stopping to look
Petr Hubka (4 years ago)
Ancient history and warm climate, all you can ask while on a sailing trip.
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