Huwiler Tower (Huwilerturm) is the smallest of the four outer town wall towers in the city of Zug (Switzerland). Its exact age is unknown, but cannot be later than 1524/25. The tower was known for a long time as the 'Hof' tower, and was called that until it was acquired by a citizen named Huwiler (a.k.a. Huwyler) in 1697. Huwiler tower was part of the defense system and the city wall, but as Zug was actually never under siege.

In 1870 the tower was auctioned and purchased by a private owner. Today the Huwiler tower stands in the pleasant surroundings of the art museum gardens.

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Address

Dorfstrasse 27, Zug, Switzerland
See all sites in Zug

Details

Founded: c. 1524
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Els Olt (3 years ago)
Great tower to rent for small parties up to 50 people. Got all the necessities like china and silver and even an oven to bake! Only small downside is that the toilets are outside and you’ll need to walk a bit to get there.
Elsebeth Olthof (3 years ago)
Great tower to rent for small parties up to 50 people. Got all the necessities like china and silver and even an oven to bake! Only small downside is that the toilets are outside and you’ll need to walk a bit to get there.
Karlo Beyer (3 years ago)
Medievil remaining part of the former city wall, part of old town and Museum Zug.
Lela Djordjevic (3 years ago)
Fascinantno, Toranj iz XVI veka...restauriran gradskim kamenom 1826 godine...služio kao utvrđenje.
Sandra (3 years ago)
Histórico lugar!
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