Hünenberg Castle was built in the 12th century and mentioned first time in 1173. At the Battle of Sempach in 1386 Hünenberg fought on the side of Habsburg family and the castle was destroyed after the defeat. During the following three decades the Hünenberg family also lost their power and reputation. In 1416, Rudolf von Hünenberg sold the ruined castle and its rights to the Bütler brothers. The keep was still standing into the 19th century.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

R. B. (7 months ago)
Sehr sauber. Eher klein.
Peter Moos (7 months ago)
Ein muss für jeden Hünenberger. Heinrich von Hünenberg hat damals die Morgartenschlacht entschieden
Marguerite Ladner (8 months ago)
Un peu difficile à trouver, il faut bien suivre les indications sur panneaux. On peut reconnaître les contours de ce lieu fait de grosses pierres, en forêt. Intéressant si on recherche l'histoire régionale.
esther felber (9 months ago)
Hier lohnt sich ein kurzer Abstecher. Nur schon der Weg zur Burg ist wirklich schön und auch nicht wirklich weit. Gratis parkplätze stehen zur Verfügung, ebenfalls hat es einen spielplatz für die kleinen
Alexander Friesen (3 years ago)
Nothing to see
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