Wildenburg Castle

Baar, Switzerland

Wildenburg castle was founded in the 13th century by the Lords of Hünenberg, vassals of the counts of Kyburg and Habsburg. The first plant was probably just a stone ring wall with wooden buildings. A round keep and a palas in the northeastern corner were added later. In 1386, the knights of Hünenberg fought against the Confederates at the Battle of Sempach on the side of Habsburg Austria. Wildenburg was destroyed after that. The castle was then left to decay and used as a quarry in the 16th century.

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Address

9, Baar, Switzerland
See all sites in Baar

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

rolok66 (19 months ago)
Die Burgruine ist eindrücklich. Die Ruine lässt sich nicht so leicht finden. Es fehlt beim Aufstieg von der Straße ein gut sichtbares Schild, das auf die Burgruine aufmerksam macht. Wenn man nicht weiß, dass es eine alte Burg in der Nähe gibt, hat kaum eine Chance sie zu finden.
Jiří Verner (19 months ago)
Nice peaceful place!
Kurt Schumacher (2 years ago)
Nice place, good hiking area - up and down Lorzentobel is a little bit steep.
Bill Roux (2 years ago)
Beautiful place to walk through the woods
Chris Ruegg (2 years ago)
Secluded and high up on a ridge Very medival
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