Petrelë Castle

Petrelë, Albania

The castle of Petrelë has a rich history, containing a tower which was built in the 6th century AD.

It is one of the tourist locations close to Tirana that attracts a great number of visitors. The Castle, the prominent wooden structure is a restaurant, is perched on a rocky hill, above the village with the same name. It has a triangular shape with two observation towers. Although it was first built in ancient times, the present building dates from the 15th century.

The Petrela Castle was part of the signaling and defense system of Krujë Castle. The castles signaled to each other by means of fires. During Skanderbeg’s fight against the Ottomans, the Petrela Castle used to be under the command of Mamica Kastrioti, Skanderbeg's sister. Today there is a restaurant inside the castle. The castle site has views of the Erzen valley, the hills, olive groves, and surrounding mountains.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ervis Trupja (17 months ago)
I loved this place. The view was stunning!
Mark Hung (18 months ago)
No tickets.No tourist and good view and good restaurants
Charlie Richmond (18 months ago)
Great, fairly accessible landmark with a friendly and not too expensive bar/cafe with the best view in the area. It's bit of climb to get there but well worth it but for those not able to hike up steep grades for 20 minutes or so, caution is advised.
Aurél Erdős (18 months ago)
Beautiful, amazing, stunning view. Renovated, cozy buildings on top with a relatively expensive restaurant.
Gerta Dervishi (20 months ago)
Beautiful place. Amazing view. It has also a restaurant and coffee so u can have there a nice time with friends.
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