Tirana Castle Ruins

Tirana, Albania

Fortress of Justinian or simply known as Tirana Castle dates is a remnant from the Byzantine-era. The preserved ruins show that the castle was probably founded in antiquity, maybe in the Early Byzantinum (400-600 AD). The fortress is the place where the main east-west and north-south roads crossed, and formed the heart of Tirana. The current fortification has three known towers and it is undergoing a process of restoration, for touristic purposes. Inside the fortified walls of the former fortress, there are many buildings that can be visited, including restaurants, hotels, and cultural institutions.

About all that is left of the fortress above ground is a 6-metre high Ottoman-era wall, covered in vines. The recently uncovered wall foundations were incorporated into the pedestrianised Murat Toptani Street, while a mosaic commemorating the 100th Anniversary of Albania's Independence was unveiled near the Albanian Parliament.

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Founded: 400-600 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

TRAVELING BIRDS (2 years ago)
It's still under construction Renovation is going on Need time to complete But in futire it gonna be really very very beautiful
Abdullah Al Jailani (2 years ago)
Currently being renovated, can't get a clear look of it at the moment. But from far it looks great!
Andrei Mihail (2 years ago)
Close now, under modern reconstruction. Worth visiting when it's clear.
Mr.aBhishek Puthenveetil (2 years ago)
Pyramid of Tirana, Tirana, Albania Not quite as impressive as the Great Pyramid of Giza, this pyramid in Albania’s capital is definitely a little strange. It was built as a monument to Enver Hoxha, a Stalinist dictator who ruled Albania for 40 years and sealed off the country from the rest of the world until his death in 1985. Built in 1988, the structure closed down when communism collapsed in 1990. It was reopened later as a conference center, theater, nightclub, television station, and other unexpected purposes. Abandoned and closed to the public for many years, the Pyramid of Tirana was planned to be demolished in 2011 but was later saved after a public outcry. There are plans in the works to turn this unusual structure into an education center.
Sarah B (2 years ago)
Place was blocked off and under construction. They're doing a complete revamp to make the pyramid modern.
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