Et'hem Bey Mosque

Tirana, Albania

The Et'hem Bey Mosque construction was started in 1791 or 1794 by Molla Bey and it was finished in 1819 or 1821 by his son Haxhi Ethem Bey, grand-grandson of Sulejman Pasha.

At the time it was built it was part of complex buildings that compose the historical center of Tirana. In front of mosque was the old Bazaar, in east the Sulejman Pasha Mosque, which was built on 1614 and destroyed during World War II, and in the north-west the Karapici mosque.

During the totalitarianism of the Socialist People's Republic of Albania, the mosque was closed. On January 18, 1991, despite opposition from communist authorities, 10,000 people entered carrying flags. This was at the onset of the fall of communism in Albania. The event was a milestone in the rebirth of religious freedom in Albania.

The Mosque today, constitutes of an architectural complex together with the Clock Tower of Tirana. Tours of the mosque are given daily, though not during prayer service. Visitors must take their shoes off before entering the inner room.

The Mosque is composed by prayer hall, a portico that surrounds its north and the minaret. On the north side is the entrance to the prayer hall, which is a squared plan and is constructed in a unique volume. It is covered with dome and the dome is semi-spherical and has no windows. The frescoes of the mosque depict trees, waterfalls and bridges; still life paintings are a rarity in Islamic art.

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Tirana, Albania
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Details

Founded: 1791
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dan Kol (2 months ago)
Great experience, polite doorguard. Beautiful interior. It's seems all polite tourists are welcomed.
Ghane (2 months ago)
Great place!! You felt very peaceful there.
kevin kaenji wayoan (3 months ago)
I feels comfortable when pray here, its clean and peaceful
Sam Co (6 months ago)
Beautiful architecture and Islamic artistry, would highly recommend heading inside to see the true beauty of the mosque
Hisham Atya (12 months ago)
Amazing place But it was under reconstruction.
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