Et'hem Bey Mosque

Tirana, Albania

The Et'hem Bey Mosque construction was started in 1791 or 1794 by Molla Bey and it was finished in 1819 or 1821 by his son Haxhi Ethem Bey, grand-grandson of Sulejman Pasha.

At the time it was built it was part of complex buildings that compose the historical center of Tirana. In front of mosque was the old Bazaar, in east the Sulejman Pasha Mosque, which was built on 1614 and destroyed during World War II, and in the north-west the Karapici mosque.

During the totalitarianism of the Socialist People's Republic of Albania, the mosque was closed. On January 18, 1991, despite opposition from communist authorities, 10,000 people entered carrying flags. This was at the onset of the fall of communism in Albania. The event was a milestone in the rebirth of religious freedom in Albania.

The Mosque today, constitutes of an architectural complex together with the Clock Tower of Tirana. Tours of the mosque are given daily, though not during prayer service. Visitors must take their shoes off before entering the inner room.

The Mosque is composed by prayer hall, a portico that surrounds its north and the minaret. On the north side is the entrance to the prayer hall, which is a squared plan and is constructed in a unique volume. It is covered with dome and the dome is semi-spherical and has no windows. The frescoes of the mosque depict trees, waterfalls and bridges; still life paintings are a rarity in Islamic art.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Tirana, Albania
See all sites in Tirana

Details

Founded: 1791
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ardit Caushi (2 years ago)
A unique mosque situated in the very heart of Tirana. The mosque, the Clock Tower, National Museum and National Theatre of Opera and Ballet from the surrounds to the famous Skanderbeg Square. Et’hem Bey Mosque was founded at the end of 18th century by Mulla Bey, with the shrine finished by his son Haxhi Et’hem Bey in the first quarter of the following century. The mosque was one of the few to be spared the destruction during which churches, mosques, tekkes, monasteries and other religious institutions were either closed or pulled down, or converted into warehouses, gymnasiums or workshops by the end of 1967. On 18thJanuary, 1991, despite opposition from the communist authorities, 10,000 people entered carrying flags. This was at the onset of the fall of communism in Albania. The event was a milestone in the rebirth of religious freedom in the country. Visitors can see the wonderful architecture of the mosque and its exquisite decorations of wall and ceiling paintings from oriental traditions. The frescoes of the mosque depict trees, waterfalls and bridges, still life paintings that are a rarity in Islamic art.
Lorend Baruti (2 years ago)
Most historic mosque of Albania.
Lazarus Lyman (2 years ago)
This mosque, built by Ottoman Turks in the 1790s, contains lovely frescoes that look uniquely Albanian. Many of its panels consist of feathery representations of items like minaret tops, purses or pouches. Others depict buildings, some looking like small cities; some like resorts with blowing palm trees. Other frescoes show nature scenes: forests, cataracts and watercourses. I’ve never seen frescoes like these in other mosques. Entrance requires no headscarf, but does require covered shoulders and legs. Respect the ceremonies being conducted in this very busy mosque.
Petr Sobíšek (2 years ago)
The oldest mosque in the city and the only one that survived the communist regime. As a visitor you can enter, see the interior and take pictures (I asked first) without any problems. You just have to take off your shoes and women have to cover their heads (a scarf is for rent for free).
Erald Halili (2 years ago)
The Et'hem Bey Mosque is an 18th-century mosque located in the center of Tirana. The Mosque most noted feature being its 35 meter tall spire which contains a spiral staircase to the top. The tower was for many decades the tallest building in Albania’s capital, and it is considered by many to be the most beautiful mosque in the country too. Closed under communist rule, the mosque reopened as a house of worship in 1991, without permission from the authorities.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lednice Castle

The first historical record of Lednice locality dates from 1222. At that time there stood a Gothic fort with courtyard, which was lent by Czech King Václav I to Austrian nobleman Sigfried Sirotek in 1249.

At the end of the 13th century the Liechtensteins, originally from Styria, became holders of all of Lednice and of nearby Mikulov. They gradually acquired land on both sides of the Moravian-Austrian border. Members of the family most often found fame in military service, during the Renaissance they expanded their estates through economic activity. From the middle of the 15th century members of the family occupied the highest offices in the land. However, the family’s position in Moravia really changed under the brothers Karel, Maximilian, and Gundakar of Liechtenstein. Through marriage Karel and Maximilian acquired the great wealth of the old Moravian dynasty of the Černohorskýs of Boskovice. At that time the brothers, like their father and grandfather, were Lutheran, but they soon converted to Catholicism, thus preparing the ground for their rise in politics. Particularly Karel, who served at the court of Emperor Rudolf II, became hetman of Moravia in 1608, and was later raised to princely status by King Matyas II and awarded the Duchy of Opava.

During the revolt of the Czech nobility he stood on the side of the Habsburgs, and took part in the Battle of White Mountain. After the uprising was defeated in 1620 he systematically acquired property confiscated from some of the rebels, and the Liechtensteins became the wealthiest family in Moravia, rising in status above the Žerotíns. Their enormous land holdings brought them great profits, and eventually allowed them to carry out their grandious building projects here in Lednice.

In the 16th century it was probably Hartmann II of Liechtenstein who had the old medieval water castle torn down and replaced with a Renaissance chateau. At the end of the 17th century the chateau was torn down and a Baroque palace was built, with an extensive formal garden, and a massive riding hall designed by Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach that still stands in almost unaltered form.

In the mid-18th century the chateau was again renovated, and in 1815 its front tracts that had been part of the Baroque chateau were removed.

The chateau as it looks today dates from 1846-1858, when Prince Alois II decided that Vienna was not suitable for entertaining in the summer, and had Lednice rebuilt into a summer palace in the spirit of English Gothic. The hall on the ground floor would serve to entertain the European aristocracy at sumptuous banquets, and was furnished with carved wood ceilings, wooden panelling, and select furniture, surpassing anything of its kind in Europe.