The Krujë castle was the center of Skanderbeg's rebellion against the Ottoman Empire. During the Albanian Revolt of 1432-1436 the city was unsuccessfully besieged by Andrea Thopia and Ottoman rule was restored. After Skanderbeg's rebellion in 1443 the castle withstood three massive sieges from the Turks respectively in 1450, 1466 and 1467 with garrisons usually no larger than 2,000-3,000 men under Skanderbeg's command. Mehmed II 'The Conqueror' himself could not break the castle's small defenses until 1478, 10 years after the death of Skanderbeg. Today it is a center of tourism in Albania, and a source of inspiration to Albanians.

Inside the castle is the Teqe of Dollme of the Bektashi (an Islamic Sufi sect), the National Skanderbeg Museum, the remains of the Fatih Sultan Mehmed mosque and its minaret, an ethnographic museum and a Turkish bath.

Another attraction for tourists is the Ethnographic Museum, located in the south side of Kruje Castle. This museum is designed based on a typical house of 19th century. It reveals the sustainable methods of tools, food, drink and furniture production in a typical household. There are also objects and old wood and metal supplies that represent the lifestyle back then in the castle.

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Address

Rruga Kala, Krujë, Albania
See all sites in Krujë

Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dave Carr (2 years ago)
This is an amazing castle first built 1,000 years ago and offers a fascinating historical museum focused on Scanderbeg's role in Albanian history. Many displays and historical items. I had a tour guide to add to the experience. Kruja also offers an amazing views and the trip up the mountain by car is worth the trip as well, 360 view including the Adriatic Sea on a clear day.
David Hardman (2 years ago)
Interesting, but you need a guide for the most benefit. A very complicated history in this area. If you are on a coach, feel very sorry for the driver, hairpin bends everywhere.
Kim E. (2 years ago)
Really nice castle with museum. The entry for the castle is free, the museum fee is very cheap. Great view of the region!
Albert Hysa (2 years ago)
I liked the history inside those walls. The two museums are gorgeous. Maybe the historicity of the place could have been preserved better by not allowing restaurants inside, but at least the walls have been covered with stone. Absolutely a must if you are visiting Albania.
Christina Kr (2 years ago)
It was such a beautiful place. The scenery there was magestic with the greenery all over the place and those colourful flowers. The view from the castle which now is a museum is just wonderful . Also the market there has a variety of things to buy which are so beautiful, some affordable and some a little expensive. Finally in the restaurants the atmosphere was friendly especially the one called ELLI, the food was delicious which I thought it was a bit expensive but worth it ! For my first time it was a wonderful experience and of course I will go there again soon ! ❤
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The first historical record of Lednice locality dates from 1222. At that time there stood a Gothic fort with courtyard, which was lent by Czech King Václav I to Austrian nobleman Sigfried Sirotek in 1249.

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In the mid-18th century the chateau was again renovated, and in 1815 its front tracts that had been part of the Baroque chateau were removed.

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