The Krujë castle was the center of Skanderbeg's rebellion against the Ottoman Empire. During the Albanian Revolt of 1432-1436 the city was unsuccessfully besieged by Andrea Thopia and Ottoman rule was restored. After Skanderbeg's rebellion in 1443 the castle withstood three massive sieges from the Turks respectively in 1450, 1466 and 1467 with garrisons usually no larger than 2,000-3,000 men under Skanderbeg's command. Mehmed II 'The Conqueror' himself could not break the castle's small defenses until 1478, 10 years after the death of Skanderbeg. Today it is a center of tourism in Albania, and a source of inspiration to Albanians.

Inside the castle is the Teqe of Dollme of the Bektashi (an Islamic Sufi sect), the National Skanderbeg Museum, the remains of the Fatih Sultan Mehmed mosque and its minaret, an ethnographic museum and a Turkish bath.

Another attraction for tourists is the Ethnographic Museum, located in the south side of Kruje Castle. This museum is designed based on a typical house of 19th century. It reveals the sustainable methods of tools, food, drink and furniture production in a typical household. There are also objects and old wood and metal supplies that represent the lifestyle back then in the castle.

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Address

Rruga Kala, Krujë, Albania
See all sites in Krujë

Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ron Frumkin (6 months ago)
Nice historical site with beautiful view from it. There is an interesting ethno-folklore museum, as well as several restaurants and many shops for tourists - all the same...
Scott Thiemann (6 months ago)
Great perch and view. I've enjoyed other castles in Albania more and also thought them more authentic.
Laura Andžāne (7 months ago)
The castle itself is beautiful, standing there as an immortal testament to the times gone by. It is, however, out and about Kruja itself where you get the feel for the place - from the stunning sights to the bazaar just a short walk from the castle. Go there and bask in the beauty that is Albania! Oh, and the restaurant at the foot of the castle, unexpectedly, is really, really good. The food was surprisingly great.
B D (10 months ago)
Great place to take pictures with impressive views of the valley. The castle is well preserved and the grounds are clean.
Mix Harvey (10 months ago)
Loved this place!! Market stalls were fabulous. Good quality items
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