Skanderbeg Square

Tirana, Albania

The Skanderbeg Square is the main plaza in the centre of Tirana. The square is named after the Albanian national hero Gjergj Kastrioti Skënderbeu. The Skanderbeg Monument dominates the square.

In 1917, the Austrians built a public square, where the Skanderbeg Square is located nowadays. After Tirana became the capital in 1920, and the population increased, several city plans were planned.

During the time of the Albanian monarchy from 1928 to 1939, the square was composed of a number of buildings that would eventually be detonated during the communist period. The square was composed of a roundabout with a fountain in the center. The Old Bazaar used to be established on the grounds of modern-day Palace of Culture, the Orthodox Cathedral (present-day Tirana International Hotel), while the former City Hall building, on the grounds of where the National Historical Museum is located nowadays. A statue of Joseph Stalin was erected, where today the Skanderbeg Monument is located. Besides the construction of the above new elements during communism, the statue of Albania's leader Enver Hoxha was erected at the space between the National Historical Museum and the National Bank.

Following the fall of communism in 1991, the statue would be removed amid student-led demonstrations. Since June 2017, the square has been renovated and is now part of the biggest pedestrian zone in the Balkans.

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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Francisco A. R. Vivas (3 years ago)
If you have the possibility to do a free city tour starting here, just do it. You would have a first view of how is the city and its history, and then you could enter some museum or just enjoy an amazing meal.
Lazarus Lyman (3 years ago)
The large square has a great pavement and is surrounded by park like areas with common flowers. You can let your thoughts wander here about the past of Albania, at the foot of the statue of the medieval hero Skanderbeg: the terrible oppression and the search for a new national identity. In the evening it offers a strange sensation because you can hardly see that you are in the middle of a busy city. When you look around you see the mosque, the Ottoman bell tower, the communist architecture and the postmodernist building by architect Winy Maas. A unique combination!
Matthew Hinrichsen (3 years ago)
Incredible! Stones that cover the square are from all around Albania. The water covers the stones during the heat of the day to keep things cool. Would recommend to all visitors to Tirana.
Mirjana Herri (3 years ago)
Main attraction of Tirana. The heart of Tirana encircled by the museum, the opera hall, the bank of Albania, near to lots of other attractions. A very good place to spend a relaxing afternoon/evening on a sunny/warm day.
Jamie Carlson (3 years ago)
An amazing beautiful town square, especially after it’s been reconstructed from the original. It maintains its uniquely Albanian heritage while making you feel like your in the heart of Europe. Be sure to check out the museum for artifacts that are equal to almost anything else you’d find in southern Europe, other than the major ones of course!
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