Ad Quintum was an ancient Roman city in Illyricum, on the Via Egnatia connecting Dyrrhachium with Byzantium. The settlement was probably founded in the late 2nd or in the early 3rd century AD, and continued to be populated until the 4th century AD. Its well preserved ruins can be seen near the present-day village Bradashesh, right next to the SH7 road. The site was extensively excavated around 1968 which uncovered a fine Roman villa and a remarkably well-preserved thermae (bathhouse) taking advantage of the abundant springs nearby.

The bathhouse consists of five main rooms. At the eastern end there is an apsed exedra that was used as a dining room. This connects to the small rectangular cold plunge-bath.

The apodyterium (undressing room) also survived with fine paintings and frescoes on its walls. Further to the western end of the building the ruins of the laconicum (heated sweating room) can be seen with the traces of the hypocaust (underfloor heating), along with the adjacent praefernium (furnace).

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Address

SH7, Bradashesh, Albania
See all sites in Bradashesh

Details

Founded: 2nd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Cheyne (4 months ago)
Missable to be honest.
Mikel Zavalani (17 months ago)
The place is almost unknown to other outside visitors. The state must intervene in the maintenance of this archaeological treasure.
Eldisa Zhebo (19 months ago)
A great place to visit 1 min drive from crossroad entrance to Elbasan
Carlheinz Lietz (3 years ago)
Jamie Hay (3 years ago)
Really only for the hardcore ruin lover. Quite clearly a bath house, but not much to interest the casual visitor. Worth it if you combine with a walk back to elbasan through the industrial wasteland.
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