Breno Castle

Breno, Italy

The Breno castle rises on a hill overlooking the town: the building was erected in the 12th century, then turned into a military stronghold at the time of the Venetian Republic (1400-1500) and finally, after being abandoned in 1598, it was reused as a stone quarry.

The castle however rises on a much more ancient site: probably the place where in the 10th-9th century BCE a prehistoric community settled.

You can reach the castle with a short walk (about 15 minutes) from the centre of Breno: the perimeter is closed by a battlemented boundary wall and by two towers. Inside you can admire the remains of the St. Michele church, of Longobard origin, then enlarged in the Romanesque period. The other buildings, the only remains of which are mostly the outside walls and the cellars with barrel vaults, were added during the Venetian reign.

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Address

Vicolo Orti 14, Breno, Italy
See all sites in Breno

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.turismovallecamonica.it

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grażyna Pęciak (11 months ago)
Amazing place
Martin Brown (12 months ago)
Super dramatic just before a thunder storm...
w ebertz (14 months ago)
Love the winding road up. Great views and well presented history.
Georgia Ruschel (17 months ago)
Medieval ruins absolutely gorgeous. Amazing views of mountains and villages around.
Raizo Samuel (18 months ago)
Nice historic site
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