Brescia New Cathedral

Brescia, Italy

Construction of the Brescia New Cathedral, Duomo Nuovo, was begun in 1604 at the site where the paleo-Christian 5th-6th century basilica of San Pietro de Dom was located. The original commission was given to Andrea Palladio, but the commission was subsequently granted to the architect Giovanni Battista Lantana. He was aided by Pietro Maria Bagnadore. Work was interrupted during a season of plague around 1630.

Work slowly but sporadically restarted on the construction, but the final impetus for completion came in the nineteenth century. The facade was designed by Giovanni Battista and Antonio Marchetti, while the dome, completed only in 1825, was designed by Luigi Cagnola and with its 80 meters is one of the highest in Italy.

The present dome was rebuilt after destruction during the Second World War. The facade contains statues of the Virgin of the Assumption and Saints Peter, Paul, James, and John.

Among the interior works of art are a scenes from the life of the Virgin by Girolamo Romanino (MarriageVisitation, and Birth) and a Sacrifice of Isaac by Moretto da Brescia.

The interior contains a monument to the famous Brescian, the Pope Paul VI, found on the left transept. The statue (1975) is a work by Raffaele Scorzelli. The imposing Baroque church towers over the small round and rustic Romanesque church of the Old Cathedral of Brescia (Duomo Vecchio).

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Details

Founded: 1604
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerald Ismaier (14 months ago)
Nice paintings.
Cesar Rodriguez (16 months ago)
A beautiful Church. Must go to mass.
Tim Hoy (17 months ago)
Beautiful building in a plaza with lots of good food and drink options nearby. The old church dates from about 1,000AD and the new one was built over approximately 200 years!
Ognian Dimitrov (19 months ago)
It was started in 1604 (not so new). During the Second World War it was destroyed and then restored. In my view, the old cathedral is more interesting.
Ognian Dimitrov (19 months ago)
It was started in 1604 (not so new). During the Second World War it was destroyed and then restored. In my view, the old cathedral is more interesting.
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