Broletto Palace

Brescia, Italy

The Broletto or Broletto Palace of Brescia has for centuries housed the civic government offices of the city. Initial construction of the Broletto took place during 1187—1230, although the structure has undergone many modifications over the centuries, specially after the Sack of Brescia in 1512 during the War of the League of Cambrai.

The long stone facade on the south fronts Via Cardinale Querini and aligns parallel the left of the Cathedral. The nearly 54 meter Tower of Pègol is still intact, with a small belfry hidden by the Ghibelline crenellations added at the beginning of the 19th century.

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Details

Founded: 1187
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

www.turismobrescia.it

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emmanuel Kodua (18 months ago)
Nice place to be
Roberto Degani (19 months ago)
Che posso dire... Mi sono unito civilmente in broletto Il giorno di s Lucia. Un piccolo gioiello incastonato nel cuore della città
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Beautiful example of medieval architecture and culture.
Francis Darlington (3 years ago)
One of the ancient palace in town. Different government offices inside
gianni rossi (3 years ago)
Broletto is the northest building inside Piazza Duomo ( Together with Duomo nuovo and Duomo vecchio (also called Rotonda) it shows the mix between Brescia's historical traditions: Roman era (Rotonda and Broletto) together with Venetian domination (Duomo nuovo).
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