Ekolsund Castle

Ekolsund, Sweden

The manor of Ekolsund was established in the 1300s. The first known owner was the council Magnus Knutsson, mentioned in 1351. In the 1500s the castle came into royal hands when King Gustav Vasa took over the ownership. It was in 1578-1611 the residence of Princess Sophia of Sweden.

The crown anyway donated Ekolsund to Åke Tott in 1618. Ekolsund was moved again to the Crown during Karl XI’s reduction, and in 1716 it was appointed to Landgraf Fredrik of Hessen-Kassel (later Fredik I). In 1747 it was sold to Prince Adolf Fredrik on the account of the new heir Gustav (later Gustav III). In 1785, Ekolsund was sold from the hands of the Crown to George Seton, a man of Scotish heritage. In 1917 it was bought by Carl Kempe. In 2002, Ekolsund was bought by a private firm.

Both southern and northern castle was built in the middle of the 1600s, excedran came centuries later. Architects were Simon de la Vallée, Nicodemus Tessin the Elder, Carl Harleman, Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz and Jean Eric Rehn.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

曹晓芳 (13 months ago)
Very quiet area with nice forest s.
David Rosenberg (15 months ago)
It was really nice, the service at the restaurant was a little slow but fine
Hanna Söderström (21 months ago)
Great tour, fantastic furnishings!
Ewa Wagner Lundholm (2 years ago)
Very nice castle with many exciting spaces.
Per Lundholm (2 years ago)
We went there for a champagne tasting, dinner and overnight stay. The castle is well preserved from 18th century which brings a fantastic atmosphere. Its surroundings are siren. The dinner and breakfast was served at the inn and dinner especially was extraordinary.
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