Gustavianum is the former main building of Uppsala University, built 1622–1625 and named after King Gustavus Adolphus. Under the cupola is the theatrum anatomicum, the second oldest in the world added to the building in the mid 17th century by Olaus Rudbeck, professor of medicine and amateur architect, among other things.

Although still used for lectures and conferences, most of Gustavianum functions as a museum, including exhibitions of objects from the university collections of Classical, Egyptian and Nordic antiquities, as well as an exhibition on the history of science and the history of Uppsala University. The Augsburg art cabinet, the best preserved of the Kunstschränke made by Philipp Hainhofer, which was given to Gustavus Adolphus in 1632 by the City of Augsburg, is on display in the Gustavianum.

The Museum has an excellent science collection of very old telescopes of Celsius and other astronomers, the oldest achromatic telescope, a book with Copernicus notes on solar eclipses, an important Lineus exhibition and currently an exhibition of the oldest known astronomical instrument and computer, the Antikythera Mechanism.

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Details

Founded: 1622-1625
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Алена Вишина (2 years ago)
I loved this museum. It's not especially large, but has a really cool Egypt section with mummies and everything, nice one with 17th century art cabinet, anatomy theater, and a small Vikings one. Defo worth visiting.
Alessia Albergati (2 years ago)
Really good museum, very interesting and free for Uppsala university students.
Carolina Zuffa (2 years ago)
It's a beautiful museum, full of old university things.
Brian (2 years ago)
Great little museum staffed by students at the university. English language tour was very nice. The 17th century anatomical theater is worth the price of admission.
Sarah Laframboise (2 years ago)
I was thoroughly impressed with this museum! The anatomical theatre is definitely the main attraction, truly a stunning representation of 17th century biology. Found the history of the university to be very fascinating! The Augustus Cabinet was also a spectacular sight, with lots to offer its viewers! Interesting story behind it as well! Although slightly random, the Egyptian history exhibit was also quite wonderful. Would recommend!
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