Uppland Museum

Uppsala, Sweden

The Upplandsmuseet (Uppland Museum) is the county museum of Uppsala County. The institution is responsible for preservation and conducting research in the area of the cultural history and archaeology of the county, including the city of Uppsala (parts of the historical province of Uppland, from which the museum takes its name, belong to Stockholm County). The permanent exhibition covers subjects such as the history of the city, of Uppsala Cathedral, and of student life at Uppsala University.

The museum is located in the old water mill formerly belonging to the university, the Akademikvarnen ("Academy mill") on the Fyris River in central Uppsala. The exterior of the building was used by Ingmar Bergman for the bishop's house in the film Fanny and Alexander (1982).

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Address

Fyristorg 2, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shailja Shukla (3 years ago)
Nice place to visit, no fee for entrance and free toilet .
Lönja Selter (3 years ago)
Really nicely laid out, a small and interesting museum of you are in the area. Some very interesting and well presents exhibits.
Robert Smith (3 years ago)
Excellent collection of Egyptian artifacts. Really well done for a medium smallish museum. Quality content. Would definitely recommend.
Klaudia Paljar (3 years ago)
Great place, lots of interesting stuff inside. I recommend it wholeheartedly.
Alistair White-Horne (3 years ago)
Great museum. Really shows the history of Upplandsmusee in an easy to access and engaging fashion.
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