Uppland Museum

Uppsala, Sweden

The Upplandsmuseet (Uppland Museum) is the county museum of Uppsala County. The institution is responsible for preservation and conducting research in the area of the cultural history and archaeology of the county, including the city of Uppsala (parts of the historical province of Uppland, from which the museum takes its name, belong to Stockholm County). The permanent exhibition covers subjects such as the history of the city, of Uppsala Cathedral, and of student life at Uppsala University.

The museum is located in the old water mill formerly belonging to the university, the Akademikvarnen ("Academy mill") on the Fyris River in central Uppsala. The exterior of the building was used by Ingmar Bergman for the bishop's house in the film Fanny and Alexander (1982).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Fyristorg 2, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details


Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shailja Shukla (2 years ago)
Nice place to visit, no fee for entrance and free toilet .
Lönja Selter (2 years ago)
Really nicely laid out, a small and interesting museum of you are in the area. Some very interesting and well presents exhibits.
Robert Smith (2 years ago)
Excellent collection of Egyptian artifacts. Really well done for a medium smallish museum. Quality content. Would definitely recommend.
Klaudia Paljar (2 years ago)
Great place, lots of interesting stuff inside. I recommend it wholeheartedly.
Alistair White-Horne (2 years ago)
Great museum. Really shows the history of Upplandsmusee in an easy to access and engaging fashion.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.