Holy Trinity Church

Uppsala, Sweden

Helga Trefaldighet (Holy Trinity) Church was inaugurated in 1302. It replaced the previous church of local Ullerås parish. The church is made of grey stone and brick and it was originally a three-nave basilica. The western tower was added in the 15th century. The church was damaged badly by fire in 1702.

The interior is particularly notable. It is decorated with paintings by the famous medieval artist Albertus Pictor, which were created in the second half of the 15th century. Of particular interest is the depiction of The Visitation, regarded as one of the finest surviving medieval paintings in Sweden.

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Address

Odinslund 4, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details

Founded: 1302
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.uppsalatourism.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Albert Ziegler (14 months ago)
It's much less bombastic than the cathedral right next to it. But the original medieval paintings covering its walls and ceiling are extremely interesting.
Beto Azamar (15 months ago)
Very nice medieval church
Goran A. (20 months ago)
The church is not as imposing as the cathedral, but it has an interesting details that people should try to find. Go around it and look in the crevices, look at the roof, look at the doors...
Olle Svensson (2 years ago)
The small church beside the dome. The people going to the services and the priests are believers that want to welcome you. The church has a perfect acoustic concerts are great in it.
Eric A.L. Axner (2 years ago)
Small in comparison to the cathedral just a few footsteps away, but pretty and with a charming medieval feeling.
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