Bentomiz Castle

Arenas, Spain

Bentomiz Castle is an ancient Moorish fortress built on a hill near the village of Arenas in the province of Málaga. It sits at a height of 711 metres, and lies to the northeast of Vélez-Málaga.

The castle site is thought to have been occupied by the Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans, although it is not clear which parts of the ruins date to which period. Roman baths have been found there. The Arabs built on the existing structure. The fortress, then called Munt Mās, was mentioned in the memoirs of Abdallah ibn Buluggin, ruler of the Taifa of Granada in the eleventh century. He described it as a formidable stronghold. The fortress surrendered to him during a civil war that he fought with his brother.

When Ferdinand II of Aragon reached the area en route to Vélez-Málaga, in the campaign that culminated in the Siege of Málaga (1487), the Granadan Sultan El Zagal brought a force to oppose them which he stationed around the Bentomiz castle. The Moors attacked the Christian siege train during the night of 25 April 1487 but were repulsed, and in panic retreated towards Granada. The castle was taken over by the Catholic Monarchs in 1487 and maintained as a defensive post. The castle is now ruined, but there are still towers, walls and underground chambers.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jane castle (3 years ago)
Views are spectacular.
Fred Kup (3 years ago)
Beautiful panoramic view of the surrounding countryside. Some remnants of old ruins and walls, requires some hiking to get to the top
Simon Conesa (3 years ago)
Remains of a Moriah castle, in a very scenic surrounding
Ole Nielsen (4 years ago)
Nice View.
Claus Poulsen (5 years ago)
Good climb, not too difficult. Not a lot to see on the top, but great view.
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