Acinipo was a city about 20 kilometers from Ronda, believed to have been founded by retired soldiers from the Roman legions more than 2,000 years ago. The remaining ruins include a Roman theater still in use today.

Some historians assert that Acinipo was created after the battle of Munda (45 BC), fought between the armies of Julius Caesar and the army of Pompey's two sons, Gnaeus and Sextus. To Caesar, Munda was supposed to be a mop-up action after Pompey's main forces were defeated in Greece. But Munda was no mop-up exercise. Tens of thousands of Romans were killed on both sides; there was no decisive victory for Caesar's armies; and one of Pompey's sons, Sextus, fled to fight another day as a famous rebel pirate against Caesar's successor, Augustus.

Some Spanish historians state that Munda is the Roman name for Ronda, where the battle of Munda may have been fought. According to Pliny, the battle of Munda was fought in Osuna, about 50 km north of Ronda in the province of Seville. But there is general agreement that Acinipo was created for retired veterans of Caesar's legions, while Arunda (Ronda) would be a separate Roman outpost, perhaps created before the Munda conflict for the veterans of Pompey's legions.

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Address

Acinipo, Ronda, Spain
See all sites in Ronda

Details

Founded: 45 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandra McMahon (16 months ago)
Some interesting ruins, not busy or touristy
Jakub Štok (17 months ago)
Friendly guy at the entrance, stunning views.
Leo Quintero Penfold (17 months ago)
Quite a good place to visit, but it’s just ruins. The main attraction is the theatre. Everything is just broken and ruined. Anyways, it’s very easy to get there. There are toilets and a sitting area in the shade. There is no cafe or restaurant!
Amy Braithwaite (20 months ago)
Not much has been excavated but the theatre and the view are worth it. The true scale of this Roman city is enormous. The amphitheater still works.
Florian Forster (2 years ago)
Great atmosphere! Watching a play here must be fascinating! Go all the way to the west of the mountains ridge and enjoy the view!
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