Julita Manor and open-air museum is located at the site of former Cistercian Julita abbey. The monastery was originally founded in 1160 at Viby, close to Sigtuna, but under the patronage of King Knut Eriksson, who donated land and a right to parts of the fishing at Älvkarleby, it was moved in 1180 to Säby by the lake Öljaren in Julita. The monastery was therefore also known as Säby, or Saba in Latin. It continued to receive rich donations from King Erik Knutsson (1210-1216), and later from other members of the aristocracy and royal circles. It was finally the owner of some 80 farms, mostly in Södermanland. At the time of the Protestant Reformation, King Gustavus Vasa appropriated the abbey and gave it in fief to Olof Arvidsson, a bailiff in Nyköping, in 1527. The secular estate thus created later had various possessors, including members of the Palbitzki and Lewenhaupt families.

In 1944, the Nordic Museum assumed the ownership of the estate in accordance with the will of the last private owner, Artur Bäckström. The manor is now a large open air museum, incorporating a small part of the abbey in the basement of one of its wings, which is open to the public. Together with another small building originally located outside the cloisters, this is all that can be seen of the abbey today, though archaeological excavations have revealed the full extent of the main abbey buildings.

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214, Katrineholm, Sweden
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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emil Hedemalm (16 months ago)
Nice botanical gardens, old refurbished monastery.
Iris Sakura (16 months ago)
Huge area with lots to explore, nice scenery, and if you love apples, you'll find so many different sorts here.
Dom Mitchell (16 months ago)
Beautiful, well-preserved manor house, now owned by the Nordic Museum in Stockholm. Well worth a visit. The restaurant, run separately to the museum, is very popular so book ahead.
Lourdes Rodriguez (18 months ago)
Beautiful place regretfully I recommend eating somewhere else, the service in the restaurant is very bad. Last year we enjoyed the food, and service was just ok. Today the servers didn’t care for us until we approached the front desk, the lady over there didn’t care to say hello and said we should be patient and she would come to the table, again when she approached the table she didn’t bother to say hello to the rest sitting there, just left 2 menus saying we should share them.
Simon Larsson (20 months ago)
A vast outdoor museum with all aspects of the local and more large scale history of agriculture and manor life in Sweden. Huge collections of objects and beautifully preserved buildings. The history of the site is well-known and presented in various ways, and this is the only flaw: there is not always information in English, and there are many, many typos and small bits of misinformation in signs and displays.
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