Julita Manor and open-air museum is located at the site of former Cistercian Julita abbey. The monastery was originally founded in 1160 at Viby, close to Sigtuna, but under the patronage of King Knut Eriksson, who donated land and a right to parts of the fishing at Älvkarleby, it was moved in 1180 to Säby by the lake Öljaren in Julita. The monastery was therefore also known as Säby, or Saba in Latin. It continued to receive rich donations from King Erik Knutsson (1210-1216), and later from other members of the aristocracy and royal circles. It was finally the owner of some 80 farms, mostly in Södermanland. At the time of the Protestant Reformation, King Gustavus Vasa appropriated the abbey and gave it in fief to Olof Arvidsson, a bailiff in Nyköping, in 1527. The secular estate thus created later had various possessors, including members of the Palbitzki and Lewenhaupt families.

In 1944, the Nordic Museum assumed the ownership of the estate in accordance with the will of the last private owner, Artur Bäckström. The manor is now a large open air museum, incorporating a small part of the abbey in the basement of one of its wings, which is open to the public. Together with another small building originally located outside the cloisters, this is all that can be seen of the abbey today, though archaeological excavations have revealed the full extent of the main abbey buildings.

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Address

214, Katrineholm, Sweden
See all sites in Katrineholm

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Kaas (2 years ago)
Wonderful place but need some restoration of the main house
Susanna Bärgård (2 years ago)
Nice area to visit with historical buildings etc.
Jonathan Mclean (2 years ago)
Wonderful experience! Meeting Pettson was a dream come true for our son (and for my wife and I!)
Atal Zia (2 years ago)
I am happy to be in julita for long time
Sandy Saunders (2 years ago)
Loved it. It proved far more interesting and entertaining than it appeared from the brochure.
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