Torshälla Church

Torshälla, Sweden

The present Torshälla Church building was originally erected in Romanesque style during the 12th century at the old heathen sacrificial place of Torsharg. Torshälla was granted city rights in 1317, making the old church insufficient for the growing population of the town. A newnave was added to the west, transforming the old nave into a choir.

During the 15th century, the church tower, church porch and vaulted ceiling were added. The tower spire was rebuilt in 1614 to reach a height of 92 meters, making Torshälla Church a landmark used for navigation on nearby Lake Mälaren and one of Sweden's tallest buildings at the time. After the tower spire and the roof were destroyed in 1873, in a fire caused by a lightning strike, they were replaced with the present, lower brick gabled roof.

Wooden sculptures depicting St. Bridget of Sweden, St. Catherine of Vadstena, Saint Gertrude and Saint George are displayed in the church. The preserved 15th century ceiling paintings are attributed to the master painter Albertus Pictor and include the oldest known depiction of eyeglasses in Sweden, showing Abraham as a reading man wearing glasses.

Along the south wall a burial vault was built during the 17th century for the family of the early industrialist and founder of Eskilstuna's iron-working industry Reinhold Rademacher (1609-1668).

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Börje Johansson (8 months ago)
Fin kyrkogård och kapell
Christer Håkansson (8 months ago)
Gudalikt
Toivo Hoffren (8 months ago)
Bra ställe för en stillsam träff
Sören Lokrantz (8 months ago)
Mycket givande kyrkobesök
Gunnar Larsson (10 months ago)
Det gäller kyrkogården.
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