Sundbyholm Castle

Eskilstuna, Sweden

Sundbyholm was originally owned by the Order of St. John, who had an abbey in Eskilstuna. After the Reformation it was confiscated to the Crown. The Sundbyholm Castle was built by the Admiral of the Navy Carl Gyllenhielm, son of King Charles IX of Sweden. The estate was given to him in 1627. The castle was later enlarged by Seved Bååts.

Sundbyholm Castle is known for the beauty of its grounds and nearby environs. It has been the subject of several paintings and drawings, the most famous of which is "The Old Castle" by Prince Eugen, Duke of Närke.

Today Sundbyholm is a hotel and offers facilities for conferences, parties and weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1648
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sofie McInnes (3 years ago)
Beautiful place! Lovely surroundings, great beach, lots of places to bbq, nice guest harbour. Loved the breakfast
Thomas Larsson (3 years ago)
The surroundings are great and it was nice to have breakfast in the castle basement but besides that the hotel experience was a disappointment. Our Junior Suite was poorly cleaned with hair in the shower drain and lots of dust on the floor. The suite itself had a really low standard and looked like it came straight out the the 80's except for the large flat screen tv on the wall and the renovated bathroom.
Laurynas Antanėlis (3 years ago)
Nice hotel close to the lake and yachtclub. Great place for walking, relax and enjoy the nature and views to the lake. Children playground next to the beach.
Adis Sibic (3 years ago)
A very nice hotel, modern and clean. Great view from the room. Although the mosquito basically ate me up I'm satisfied with my visit.
Cecilia Ström (3 years ago)
Very nice location with a big green area and close to water. Room was a bit small, but the castle itself was very nice and felt genuine. Excellent food. Hot spa was very hot.
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