Sundbyholm Castle

Eskilstuna, Sweden

Sundbyholm was originally owned by the Order of St. John, who had an abbey in Eskilstuna. After the Reformation it was confiscated to the Crown. The Sundbyholm Castle was built by the Admiral of the Navy Carl Gyllenhielm, son of King Charles IX of Sweden. The estate was given to him in 1627. The castle was later enlarged by Seved Bååts.

Sundbyholm Castle is known for the beauty of its grounds and nearby environs. It has been the subject of several paintings and drawings, the most famous of which is "The Old Castle" by Prince Eugen, Duke of Närke.

Today Sundbyholm is a hotel and offers facilities for conferences, parties and weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1648
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claes Sandahl (4 months ago)
Medium experience. Mediocre food, you don’t sleep in the old castle. Lovely surroundings
oh gaming (5 months ago)
On the day that i went there was a concert and i could not enjoy with the family.
Martin Thorning (5 months ago)
Great place, good food and service. Pricy but we'll worth it. The decor leaves slot to be desired with old hunting trophies and bear skins on the wall as well as creepy paintings of old owners and such.
Rizwan Hanif (6 months ago)
Nice place for doing BBQ and beach is available for kids to go inside water.
Mazen Reda (6 months ago)
Nice place ?
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