Aguilar de la Frontera Castle

Aguilar de la Frontera, Spain

Castillo de Aguilar is known from at least the 9th century. It is mostly in ruin, a part turned into a cistern for the local aqueduct. In the 9th century Aguilar de la Frontera became the headquarters of the rebel Umar ibn Hafsun, who built extensive fortifications and reinforced the castle. However, in 891, Umar ibn Hafsun lost the town to emir Abdallah ibn Muhammad of Córdoba. Due to its strategic position, it was contested and, after the dissolution of the caliphate of Córdoba, it became part of the cora of Cabra.

In 1240 it was conquered by the Christians, although numerous Muslims were allowed to remain. King Peter I of Castile assigned its seigniory to Alfonso Fernandez Coronel, but later reannexed it to the crown. The town was renamed Aguilar of the Frontier due to its position on the border with the Moorish Kingdom of Granada.

Since the mid-seventeenth century the castle was no longer needed for defense, consequently in 1860 it was converted into a Hospital. The Lisbon earthquake in 1755 caused part of the building to collapse. The fallen stones were reused for various public and private works. The remains of the castle are located on the hill to the north of the town on the extension of Calle Villa. The Tourist office is located at the castle. Free guided tours available on request.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adela Lopez (9 months ago)
I like it for its story
Jb. RP (10 months ago)
Magnificent location, with hundreds of years of history.
Javier Palma Varo (10 months ago)
Great archaeological work and an environment with a huge historical content
Mª José Ortiz (10 months ago)
You have to come to visit it on summer nights, enjoy the wonderful sunsets offered by the Cordovan countryside and the pleasant coolness of summer afternoons, stroll along its paths illuminated with lights, sit and let yourself be carried away by the senses and the sounds of the night.
Manuel FERNANDEZ HERRERA (3 years ago)
Gran descubrimiento aunque poco conocido. Necesita más promoción
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