Royal Stables of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

Royal Stables (Caballerizas Reales) are a set of stables in Córdoba. The building is situated in the historic centre and borders the Guadalquivir. The stables housed the best stallions and mares of the royal stud breed Andalusian horse.

By royal decree of Felipe II on November 28, 1567, the Spanish Horse breed with formalized standards was created, and a royal stable was established in Córdoba. The king commissioned Diego López de Haro y Sotomayor, 1st Marquis of El Carpio to build the stables on part of the site of the Alcázar fortress.

The building design is characterized by a distinct military style in keeping with its location by the Alcázar fortress. The main area features a cross-vaulted roof which is supported on sandstone columns and is divided into small stables. The building features a permanent equestrian display.

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    Details

    Founded: 1567
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Pablo Herrera (2 years ago)
    Quite boring. The music used in the show doesnt help at all. On the other side. The horses are beautiful and impressive
    George Cairns (2 years ago)
    Well trained horses not allowed to take pics os show
    R Palmer (2 years ago)
    We visited the royal stables for a show last night. I love horses and have ridden since I was 4yo, so was excited to see the Andalusian breed while in Cordoba. We bought the slightly more expensive tickets (20 euro pax), which gave us early access to the stables to see the horses as they were prepared for the show. It also gave us reserved seats with a central view. The show was sold out and the audience appeared to love it. There was lots of applause, especially as the horses performed more technically advanced moves. We were sat with a few other couples, who said they did not know much about horses, but they said they absolutely loved it. The Andalusian is a beautiful breed and it was wonderful to see them here, and observe their classical-led training. The show structure was also well organised and slick with a bar serving drinks at a reasonable price, numbered seats, cooling systems over the seating and an opportunity for all ticket holders to visit the horses after the show. We could not take photos during the show so it was a nice opportunity for everyone to get some pictures. I would love to return to see the horses training in the day ahead of the show, which is also an option for visitors. The stables and turnout of horses and riders was also immaculate. I just need a large lottery win for a setup at home like this :-D
    Saad Suri (2 years ago)
    One of the best place in cordoba to have the extreme experience of culture and history. The show is highly exclusive and the hard work that has been put into the preparation of these acts can be seen very clearly. Its admirable and people love visiting this place along with family. This one hour show will make you forget your rough day and you will enjoy the dance and training of the horses. Highly recommended place to visit once you are in cordoba.
    Canadian Travel Review (2 years ago)
    World class stallions, centuries old stables, Medieval castle and palm trees in the background, accomplished riders. Twice a day the horses go into a ring to exercise and practice and it is a great way to spend a few hours. The cost is reasonable. You are allowed to get close and pet the remarkably well behaved horses. If you are a horse lover, this is a must-do. Even if you are not, this is a special place. From Wed to Sat there is an evening show. We really wanted to go to the show but were not in town at this time. It is an hour and features costumes, flameco dancing (with horses!), and some horse acrobatics. These horses are related to the Lippizaner stallions in Vienna and are renowned for their grace, intellect and agility. No photos are allowed in the site but everyone takes photos anyways. My suggestion to the managers of the stables: allow photos only in designated places. You are more likely to have people respect the no photo rule. You will also have visitors bring back photos to their home, marvel at the horses for years to come. They will also show their friends, who will then want to visit the stables, Cordoba and Spain.
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