Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba, also known as the Great Mosque of Córdoba and the Mezquita is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.

According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. The mosque underwent numerous subsequent changes: Abd al-Rahman II ordered a new minaret, while in 961 Al-Hakam II enlarged the building and enriched the Mihrab. The last of such reforms was carried out by Almanzor in 987. It was connected to the Caliph's palace by a raised walkway, mosques within the palaces being the tradition for previous Islamic rulers – as well as Christian Kings who built their palaces adjacent to churches. The Mezquita reached its current dimensions in 987 with the completion of the outer naves and courtyard.

In 1236, Córdoba was conquered by King Ferdinand III of Castile, and the centre of the mosque was converted into a Catholic cathedral. Alfonso X oversaw the construction of the Villaviciosa Chapel and the Royal Chapel within the mosque. The kings who followed added further Christian features, such as King Henry II rebuilding the chapel in the 14th century. The minaret of the mosque was also converted to the bell tower of the cathedral. It was adorned with Santiago de Compostela's captured cathedral bells. Following a windstorm in 1589, the former minaret was further reinforced by encasing it within a new structure.

The most significant alteration was the building of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the middle of the expansive structure. The insertion was constructed by permission of Charles V, king of Castile and Aragon. Artisans and architects continued to add to the existing structure until the late 18th century.

Architecture

The building's floor plan is seen to be parallel to some of the earliest mosques built from the very beginning of Islam. It had a rectangular prayer hall with aisles arranged perpendicular to the qibla, the direction towards which Muslims pray. The prayer hall was large and flat, with timber ceilings held up by arches of horseshoe-like appearance.

In planning the mosque, the architects incorporated a number of Roman columns with choice capitals. Some of the columns were already in the Gothic structure; others were sent from various regions of Iberia as presents from the governors of provinces. Ivory, jasper, porphyry, gold, silver, copper, and brass were used in the decorations. Marvellous mosaics and azulejos were designed. Later, the immense temple embodied all the styles of Morisco architecture into one composition.

The building is most notable for its arcaded hypostyle hall, with 856 columns of jasper, onyx, marble, granite and porphyry. These were made from pieces of the Roman temple that had occupied the site previously, as well as other Roman buildings, such as the Mérida amphitheatre. The double arches were an innovation, permitting higher ceilings than would otherwise be possible with relatively low columns. The double arches consist of a lower horseshoe arch and an upper semi-circular arch.

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Olabode Olusesan Jegede said 3 months ago
The Great Mosque of Cordoba is an other example the form never follows function at all times. The form was used as Mosque and as Catholic church at different times in the life of the structure, just like Haggia Sophia of Turkey. Ornament essentially defines the character of a form to define the function.


Details

Founded: 784 AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Avi Burshteyn (10 months ago)
History in the air
Kephra Froehlich (10 months ago)
Amazing!!! Everyone should see the Mosque at least once in their life.
Saqib Ali (10 months ago)
Historical place for all religions
Francisco Ramirez (11 months ago)
Literally a sacred space, one of the best preserved places of worship.
David Serra (11 months ago)
The place is beautiful. But expensive, people at the door are not kind and no signs in other languages than Spanish . You have no right to any sort or map or QR code that could walk you though it on your own..because they want you to pay 20 Euros for a guide... I like tourist guides, but it just feels wrong here...so, no signs explaining things because is a cult place, but guides talking loudly at 20Euros per person doesn’t bother the (like me) faithful visitors...nahhh...don’t like it. I actually liked the building as is pretty unique, but the lower rating is because in general in Cordoba we didn’t feel welcomed. Is August, after a Pandemia, we are being careful and respectful...we didn’t feel as welcomed and looked after as in Granada...nor in hotel, shops, or bars and restaurants...
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