Puerta del Puente

Córdoba, Spain

In the 16th century, the authorities of Córdoba decided to improve the condition of the entrance to the city due to the deteriorated state of the existing gate. With this goal in mind, on February 18, 1572, mayor Alonso Gonzalez de Arteaga issued the order to build the Bridge Gate.

Reasons given focused on the fact that it was one of the city's main gates, handling a high volume of movement in terms of both people and supplies. In addition to enlarging the gateway, the city's officials wished to improve the artistic merits of the gate as part of an urban renewal.

Bridge Gate construction was started by Francisco de Montalbán although few months later, in 1571, Hernán Ruiz III which took over the works. Complications arose with respect to the design of the door, leading to a spike in the expected cost: the initial budget of 1400 ducats tripled to 3100. Work apparently stopped for a four year period until 1576, when Hernán Ruiz resumed his work. Possibly due to the indebtedness of the City Council of Cordoba and general lack of funds, the project remained was unfinished.

In 1912, under the reign of Alfonso XIII, the area in which the Puerta del Puente was located was stripped of its walls and rebuilt in 1928 as a memorial gate, repeating on the inner side forms the outer side. In the late fifties the level of all the land bordering the door, until the original ground level was restored, when neighbouring buildings were lowered.

In the early twenty-first century, the first restoration of the Puerta del Puente took place, at which point archaeological excavations took place. Further restorative work continued in 2005.

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    Founded: 1572
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    User Reviews

    Monica Rivera (5 months ago)
    Just a gate at one side of the bridge. Good spot for pics.
    Amine Boushaq (13 months ago)
    A great place and a must visit one.
    jule 814 (14 months ago)
    Nice
    Ismaila Kane (14 months ago)
    Nice
    Mike773 U (15 months ago)
    'Bridge Gate'. Walking away from the beautiful Roman Bridge 'Puente Romano', this used to the entrance to the city. Dates back to the reign of Julius Caesar (44 BC), later a Moorish Gate and then restored circa 720 AD. 3 further changes occured to what it is to date.
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