Puerta del Puente

Córdoba, Spain

In the 16th century, the authorities of Córdoba decided to improve the condition of the entrance to the city due to the deteriorated state of the existing gate. With this goal in mind, on February 18, 1572, mayor Alonso Gonzalez de Arteaga issued the order to build the Bridge Gate.

Reasons given focused on the fact that it was one of the city's main gates, handling a high volume of movement in terms of both people and supplies. In addition to enlarging the gateway, the city's officials wished to improve the artistic merits of the gate as part of an urban renewal.

Bridge Gate construction was started by Francisco de Montalbán although few months later, in 1571, Hernán Ruiz III which took over the works. Complications arose with respect to the design of the door, leading to a spike in the expected cost: the initial budget of 1400 ducats tripled to 3100. Work apparently stopped for a four year period until 1576, when Hernán Ruiz resumed his work. Possibly due to the indebtedness of the City Council of Cordoba and general lack of funds, the project remained was unfinished.

In 1912, under the reign of Alfonso XIII, the area in which the Puerta del Puente was located was stripped of its walls and rebuilt in 1928 as a memorial gate, repeating on the inner side forms the outer side. In the late fifties the level of all the land bordering the door, until the original ground level was restored, when neighbouring buildings were lowered.

In the early twenty-first century, the first restoration of the Puerta del Puente took place, at which point archaeological excavations took place. Further restorative work continued in 2005.

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    Founded: 1572
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    User Reviews

    B. Tee (7 months ago)
    Breathtaking architecture
    Arijana Sa (9 months ago)
    Beautifull
    Luis Retana Acevedo (14 months ago)
    Magnificent remains from Cordoba's Roman past, facing monumental Roman Bridge (Puente Romano)
    Amer Alalwani (18 months ago)
    Nice structure and lovely place with great view of Roman Bridge and the city of Cordoba from the other side.
    Violeta Delgado (2 years ago)
    Beautiful place but DO NOT drive into the town and it you do be super careful not to go into areas you are not supposed to. The streets are tricky and there are many narrow streets were you car barely fits. We had a nightmare of a drive driving through these streets. We wished someone would have warned us. It is well worth the stop if you are near as the place is gorgeous.
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