Caliphal Baths

Córdoba, Spain

The Caliphal Baths are Arab baths in Córdoba. They are situated in the historic centre which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1994. The hammam ('baths) are contiguous to the Alcázar andalusí; ablutions and bodily cleanliness were an essential part of a Muslim's life, mandatory before prayer, besides being a social ritual.

The baths were constructed in the 10th century, under the Caliphate of Al-Hakam II for the enjoyment of the caliph and his court. Between the 11th and 13th centuries, they were used by Almoravids and Almohads, their dynasties noted by the plaster-carved acanthus motif and epigraphic bands of the era, which are stored in the Archaeological and Ethnological Museum of Cordoba. The remains of the baths were found accidentally in 1903 in the Campo Santo de los Mártires, and were subsequently buried. Between 1961 and 1964, a group of city historians recovered them.

The Caliphal Baths have different sections of cold, warm and hot water baths. Architectural details include rooms with masonry walls, semicircular arches, and columns with capitals. The ceiling is punctuated by cut-outs of stars.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jay Saman (17 months ago)
I wasn't able to get in
Dr. Abdallah Marouf (22 months ago)
To see all that work and beauty underground is fascinating...! The place is relatively small but not crowded, and it’s for sure worth the effort. It’s a little bit creepy to know that you are standing in a hall that witnessed two murders of Umayyad Caliphs though!! But this was exciting though!
Jason Baldachino (2 years ago)
Simple, short. Good bilingual exhibits.
Jason Baldachino (2 years ago)
Simple, short. Good bilingual exhibits.
Big Nev Paddock (2 years ago)
Not worth 3 euros per person not for 10min.. It should be free..
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