Caliphal Baths

Córdoba, Spain

The Caliphal Baths are Arab baths in Córdoba. They are situated in the historic centre which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1994. The hammam ('baths) are contiguous to the Alcázar andalusí; ablutions and bodily cleanliness were an essential part of a Muslim's life, mandatory before prayer, besides being a social ritual.

The baths were constructed in the 10th century, under the Caliphate of Al-Hakam II for the enjoyment of the caliph and his court. Between the 11th and 13th centuries, they were used by Almoravids and Almohads, their dynasties noted by the plaster-carved acanthus motif and epigraphic bands of the era, which are stored in the Archaeological and Ethnological Museum of Cordoba. The remains of the baths were found accidentally in 1903 in the Campo Santo de los Mártires, and were subsequently buried. Between 1961 and 1964, a group of city historians recovered them.

The Caliphal Baths have different sections of cold, warm and hot water baths. Architectural details include rooms with masonry walls, semicircular arches, and columns with capitals. The ceiling is punctuated by cut-outs of stars.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jason Baldachino (10 months ago)
Simple, short. Good bilingual exhibits.
Big Nev Paddock (11 months ago)
Not worth 3 euros per person not for 10min.. It should be free..
Jeff Boudreau (11 months ago)
Waste of time. Sure, it’s old. Should spend more time in the Cathedral or the Alcazar.
April Armstrong (17 months ago)
It was ok. Get better fill for the baths if u go to the local hammam.!
Jason C (17 months ago)
This is not worth the visit. Go only if you feel like seeing ruins that don't resemble ancient baths and lots of dirt floors.. Jazzed up by moody lighting. The information signs posted at each area are a useful read though.
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