Baena Castle

Baena, Spain

The first documents of Baena Castle date at the beginning of the 9th century (890), during the reign of Emir Ahdullah, whose Governor in Regio since 889 had been Omar Ben Hafsum who rebelled and took Baena in 891.

In 1228, the governor of Fernando III in Baeza attacked the castle, belonging then to Seville. Subsequently the castle was attacked by Mohamed, the king of Granada, 1297. In July 1320 a peace treaty was signed in this castle between the Alonso XI and Ismail, King of Granada, which guaranteed this peace for eight years. In 1332, this same Alfonso XI garrisoned the castle in the face of danger from Granada, and in 1341 he left Baena to attack the Nasrid kingdom, not before providing the fortress with men and materials. In 1362 Abu Said, King of Granada, the Bermejo, took refuge in Baena and was accompanied to Seville by people from Cordoba.

In 1401 the castle was ceded by Henry III to the Marshal, Don Diego Fernández de Córdoba, with the opposition of the inhabitants of the city, taking possession of it in 1438.

Since the 16th century it has been used as the Palacio de los Duques. Diego Fernández de Córdoba, III Conde de Cabra, established his residence in the castle at the beginning of the 16th century and gave it a more palatial character. In 1520 the Baena and Condado de Cabra estate became related by marriage to the Duchy of Sessa. En 1566, by a Royal Decree of Philip II, Baena became the Duchy of Baena whereupon the lords of Baena came to be the Dukes of Sessa and Baena. It is from that time when there began to be a succession of structural changes in the fortified enclosure aimed at making the place suitable as a residence, and the military character of the complex faded into the background.

Baena Castle is square and still has part of its original walls and three of the four towers located in those of: El Secreto, Los Cascabeles and the last one of the Cinco Esquinas or Las Arqueras.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zeta Paco (9 months ago)
Una gran pena al arreglar algo historico con materiales modernos, una gran pena
aurea del toboso (9 months ago)
Cuesta 2€ la entrada. El castillo da la sensación de que le hicieron la restauración y ahí se ha quedado. No hay ningún cartel ni folleto informativo acerca de su historia, vestigios, y obra de remodelación. El patio no tiene mantenimiento. Muchas hierbas sin cortar... La chica de la entrada simpática pero carece de información acerca de la historia del mismo. No hay ninguna sala con una proyección. O maqueta acerca de cómo era, historia sobre los depósitos de agua que tanto impresionan....Hay una sala con unos cuadros de fotografías antiguas que se apoyan sobre sillas en vez de estar colgados!!! No sé, da pena.
María C. Ortiz M. (12 months ago)
Este castillo ha sido restaurado recientemente. Apenas conservaba parte de las murallas y una torre. Ha sido utilizado para albergar en su interior los depósitos de agua para abastecer al pueblo. En un salón cuenta con una pequeña exposición. Merece la visita por las vistas sobre el pueblo y alrededores.
Tony Clifford (18 months ago)
Unfortunately, closed on the day we visited. Good, easy access. Will try again another time.
SlyDuck (2 years ago)
It's a really nice place to visit
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